when should i start growing weed outdoors

From the desert states of Arizona and New Mexico to the more tropical regions such as the Carolinas and Florida, these states benefit from lots of sunshine and warmer weather. In these states, the key to growing cannabis outside in pots is to plant on the earlier side if you’re organized early enough. Place your pots outside as early as March, although April is fine too.

A pot and optimized soil aren’t the only things included. You’ll also receive a seed germination kit, a step-by-step grow guide, aerated top soil mix, a rooting booster, magnifying lenses, scissors for trimming, natural pest repellants, a watering can, and a spray bottle. Need seeds? A Pot for Pot includes a coupon that you can use to purchase some of the best cannabis seeds to grow outside . If you have ever avoided growing cannabis because of how complicated it is, a Pot for Pot has taken the guess work out of the equation.

Lots of people would like to know how long it takes to grow a cannabis plant outside. You need this information because you want to get your plant(s) out early enough, but not too early. Unfortunately, there is no simple answer.

Includes Northwestern states (Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado), the Midwest (Minnesota, Iowa, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota), the Northeast (including New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Maryland, and Pennsylvania), and Alaska.

That is why autoflowering strains are some of the best cannabis strains to grow outside . They will grow correctly even if they are exposed to a little light during the night. Their straightforward growing process is perfect for those already busy with day jobs or other hobbies who simply want to grow some high-quality cannabis plants on the side. If this applies to you, autoflowering seeds growing in a Pot for Pot are likely an excellent solution.

Northern States.

In general, if there is still a risk of frost, it’s not a good idea to plant yet, or you will be majorly risking your plants. However, if you plant too late, you might end up with a disappointing end result. Luckily, this state-by-state guide can help.

Online Grow Support.

There are a variety of ways to section the different regions of the United States. For this guide, we’ll break it down into a few of the broader sections to provide a general idea of the country’s climate regions. Since the climates can still vary quite a bit within each region, we’ll sometimes include state-specific details as well.

Grow with the Sun.

The big question when it comes to growing outdoor cannabis is when to germinate the seeds and plant them. This answer varies widely by state. However, it should not be ignored. Timing your planting incorrectly could make or break your garden. If you plant too early, your young plants might not make it to their adulthood because of less-than-ideal temperatures.

Harvest up to a pound.

The Pot for Pot Complete Grow kit ends the confusion that likely comes from growing cannabis for the first time. It’s also ideal for veteran growers who want a low-maintenance, effective way of growing cannabis plants. A Pot for Pot’s Complete Grow Kits are specifically designed to help anyone enjoy the benefits of growing cannabis outside .

Autoflowering plants, however, take exactly how long you are told they will. In other words, the information about the growing time of the strain will be accurate, since it is not based on daylight or nighttime hours. In general, autoflowering plants grow faster than photosensitive plants – taking roughly 3 months to go from germination to harvest. That means you can either be a bit relaxed with the timing, as long as you have three months of adequate sunshine and warmer weather. This also means those who are super proactive can grow cannabis outside twice in one season – doubling their harvest. If you want to do it that way, it is best to germinate and grow your plants a bit inside before moving them outdoors, just to ensure a surprise frost doesn’t hit them.

The fact is “normal” marijuana plants are not always easy to grow. If you are growing cannabis outside in pots , you’ll need plenty of equipment, as well as lots of planning, months in advance. For these types of strains, knowing the best place to grow cannabis outside is more than personal convenience and access to sunlight. Planning an outdoor garden with photosensitive plants means finding an utterly dark spot far away from streetlights. You’ll also need to pay careful attention to the best time to grow cannabis outside . Otherwise, your plants may flower too early in their growth cycle or too late in the growing season. If either of these things happens, your plants won’t have grown enough when it comes time to harvest.

Northwestern states, especially Oregon and Washington, have to deal with rain as one of the biggest concerns. The best time to grow cannabis outside here is in early spring, which can be different from year to year, depending on the weather, but primarily meaning March or April. Sometimes May can be a good time to start, depending on how cool the weather has been that year. Keep in mind, autoflowering plants have a shorter growing time, so waiting until the later side is not a bad idea for these strains. This helps ensure good weather and more sunshine from the get-go.

Why does this method work?

The difficulty of growing cannabis can vary based on the type of plants you choose to grow. Non-autoflowering (photosensitive) cannabis plants depend on the specific timing of daylight (and darkness) to grow properly. Autoflowering strains, on the other hand, have their own internal clocks, so to speak. No matter how much sunlight they receive, they will go through their seedling, vegetating, and flowering phases as usual. This means you don’t have to worry quite as much about the timing of the seasons. As long as your plants receive adequate amounts of sunlight, water, and have good enough levels of humidity and nutrients, they will do just fine.

Spring is finally here, let’s get your plants outside! Even if you don’t have a huge yard, you can still enjoy the great outdoors by planting and growing your very own cannabis. Even if it’s still a bit chilly where you are, now is the time to start. Growing cannabis outdoors may be easier than you might expect, especially with a growing system like a Pot for Pot.

The rain in the Northwest can make mold an issue, especially close to harvest time. This makes the complete growing kit from a Pot for Pot so useful. Because every kit includes discounts on some of the best autoflower cannabis for outside grow seeds, it’s not hard to find the best strains for this region. With autoflowering plants, you can harvest before things get too wet and rainy during the impending fall and winter, lowering the risk of mold and mildew.

A Pot for Pot, on the other hand, makes planning and executing a marijuana home grow super simple. The Complete Grow Kit provides just about everything you need to nurture a successful plant in as few as 80 days. All that’s left for you is selecting your seeds, adding some water, and providing plenty of sunshine.

The beauty of growing in the Southern states is you can easily complete two rounds of growing if you use autoflowering seeds. Just remember to bring your pots outside early enough (March or early April). For the desert states, make sure the plants get extra water both at the beginning and throughout the entire growing season.

The length of time needed to go from seed to harvest varies hugely depending on the strain. This is because genetics can be extremely different depending on the dominant strain, whether it is a hybrid, and whether it is photosensitive or autoflowering. Besides that, the grower’s own behavior can make a difference as well. If you plant earlier in the season, a photosensitive plant will take longer to reach harvest. If you plant later in the season, it will take less time. Of course, this will only work if the plant has been given enough time to properly grow, especially during the vegetation and flowering phases.

Seed Coupon Included.

Can You Grow Cannabis Outside?

Includes the Southwest (Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Nevada, Utah, and California) and the Southeast (Arkansas, Alabama, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Louisiana, Florida, Mississippi, and Kentucky), and Hawaii.

For many, the idea of outdoor growing paints a mental picture of working in your backyard or a community garden, tending lovingly to your plants every day. But this is not always possible, either because you want to keep your plants discreet or because you simply don’t have space for it. Even if you don’t have the best place to grow cannabis outside , a Pot for Pot Complete Kits can help. Simply set your potted plant on your balcony or patio. Of course, you don’t need a kit to grow a potted plant. However, if you choose to ‘do-it-yourself,’ you’d have to plan, buy, and assemble everything yourself as well. With that comes the opportunity to make critical mistakes that could ruin your entire investment. If you’re only going to grow one or two plants, don’t you want to ensure that they succeed and produce something worth your effort?

States that are higher altitude and/or have colder winters, such as Colorado, Montana, the Midwest, and the Northeast, also benefit from the shorter growing season of autoflowering plants. The best time to plant might not be until April or May, and that’s okay; the plants will still be ready to harvest before the weather starts getting too cold. In general, it should be safe to bring your plants outside by the time the end of April rolls around. This applies to the majority of states in the North, although you might want to bring them indoors at night when the risk of nighttime frost still exists.

For those who have not gone through the process of growing “normal” photosensitive plants, the difference is huge. Photosensitive plants will not even enter their flowering phase until the hours of uninterrupted darkness reach a certain length. This must be consistent every night for several weeks to be successful. If even a flashlight or streetlight interrupts this darkness, the cycle is interrupted, and it takes that much longer to reach the point of entering the flowering phase.

Grow Year Round.

Growing in pots, in general, makes the process of growing anything easier, since you can move your plants around (between indoors and outdoors) during undesirable weather developments. On top of that, a Pot for Pot also provides the nutrients as well as the best soil for growing cannabis outside. Our simple, easy-to-follow process is literally the best way to grow cannabis outside . This is true whether you are growing for the first time or want to make growing cannabis outside in pots as effortless as growing any other plant.

The first step to growing cannabis is doing your research. You need to research a location, your seeds, whether you’ll use pots or plant in the ground, what kinds of nutrients to use, what the weather is like, and so on. For some people, this level of detail is exciting. For others, especially beginners, thinking about how to grow cannabis outside can seem a bit overwhelming. That’s where a Pot for Pot comes in.

Note: This information is based on climate rather than laws. It’s still a good idea to check into your state’s local laws to see if and what you can grow.

As roots develop, the stalk will rise and you’ll begin to see the first iconic fan leaves grow, at which point your cannabis plant can be considered a seedling.

As the sun reaches up high in the sky, your cannabis will want to as well. Make sure all of your plants are outside by the Summer Solstice.

The first marijuana plant stage begins with the seed. A cannabis seed should feel hard and dry, and be light- to dark-brown in color. An undeveloped seed is generally squishy and green or white in color and likely won’t germinate.

What are a weed plant’s growth stages?

Flowering stage length: 8-11 weeks.

Vegetative plants appreciate healthy soil with nutrients. Feed them with a higher level of nitrogen at this stage.

Be mindful to increase your watering as the plant develops. When it’s young, your plant will need water close to the stalk, but as it grows the roots will also grow outward, so start watering further away from the stalk in the soil so roots can stretch out and absorb water more efficiently.

Take meticulous notes on when and how you perform each step, as well as what the weather is like. Other notes can include how much water you give plants, at what intervals, and how much nutrients you give them. Pictures will also give you a better sense of how your plants look along the way.

Be sure to keep a grow journal to track the progress of your plants. Looking back on your notes will help you learn from mistakes and maximize the quality and quantity of your buds.

It’s important to know these stages and how long each lasts to know what the plant needs and when. Knowing where your cannabis plants are in their life cycle will dictate when to prune, train, and trellis your plants, and when to harvest.

Cannabis plants go through a series of stages as they grow and mature, and those different growth stages call for different amounts of light, nutrients, and water.

When should you grow marijuana?

Buds typically grow the most toward the end of the flowering life cycle. You probably won’t notice much budding out at the beginning of the flowering stage, and it will slow down toward the end of the cycle, when buds become fully formed.

The flowering stage is the final stage of growth for a cannabis plant. This is when plants start to develop resinous buds and your hard work will be realized. Most strains flower in 8-9 weeks, but some can take even longer, especially some sativas.

Generally speaking, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks, or about 3-8 months, to grow a weed plant from seed. It’ll be quicker if you start with a clone or an autoflower seed.

If you’re growing indoors, you can force a weed plant to flower after only a few weeks when it’s small, or after several weeks when it’s big. If you’re growing outdoors, you’re at the whim of the seasons and will have to wait until the sun starts to go down in fall for it to flower and then to harvest.

Even if growing outdoors, a lot of growers will start their seeds inside under an artificial light to help them through this delicate stage of marijuana growth.

Notes on marijuana growth phases.

Outdoors, flowering occurs naturally when the plant receives less light each day as summer turns into fall. Indoor growers can trigger the flowering cycle by reducing the amount of light marijuana plants receive from 16 to 12 hours a day.

Marijuana light cycle: indoor—16 hours a day; outdoor—at least 6 hours of direct sunlight (“full sun”), plus several hours indirect sunlight.

Marijuana light cycle: 12 hours a day.

Be very careful to not overwater the plant in its seedling stage—its roots are so small, it doesn’t need much water to thrive.

The Spring Equinox is a good reminder that it’s time to kick off the outdoor growing process and start germinating your seeds.

Within the flowering stage, there are three subphases:

Take meticulous notes on when and how you perform each step, as well as what the weather is like. Other notes can include how much water you give plants, at what intervals, and how much nutrients you give them. Pictures will also give you a better sense of how your plants look along the way.

At this stage, the plant is vulnerable to disease and mold. Keep its environment clean and monitor excess moisture. Be sure to give it plenty of light.

Outdoors, flowering occurs naturally when the plant receives less light each day as summer turns into fall. Indoor growers can trigger the flowering cycle by reducing the amount of light marijuana plants receive from 16 to 12 hours a day.

Important dates for growing marijuana outdoors.

It’s important to know these stages and how long each lasts to know what the plant needs and when. Knowing where your cannabis plants are in their life cycle will dictate when to prune, train, and trellis your plants, and when to harvest.

When your marijuana plant becomes a seedling, you’ll notice it developing more of the traditional cannabis fan leaves. As a sprout, the seed will initially produce leaves with only one ridged blade. Once new growth develops, the leaves will develop more blades (3, 5, 7, etc.). A mature cannabis plant will have between 5 or 7 blades per leaf, but some plants may have more.

The flowering stage is the final stage of growth for a cannabis plant. This is when plants start to develop resinous buds and your hard work will be realized. Most strains flower in 8-9 weeks, but some can take even longer, especially some sativas.

If you’re growing indoors, you can force a weed plant to flower after only a few weeks when it’s small, or after several weeks when it’s big. If you’re growing outdoors, you’re at the whim of the seasons and will have to wait until the sun starts to go down in fall for it to flower and then to harvest.

If you need to determine the sex of your plants (to discard the males), they will start showing sex organs a few weeks into the veg stage. It’s imperative to separate males so they don’t pollinate the females.

Marijuana light cycle: 12 hours a day.

Seedling stage.

Seedling stage length: 2-3 weeks.

Generally speaking, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks, or about 3-8 months, to grow a weed plant from seed. It’ll be quicker if you start with a clone or an autoflower seed.

Marijuana light cycle: 16 hours a day.

We can’t stress enough that the timeframes in the above graphic are ranges of time for the Northern Hemisphere. You’ll need to adjust them based on your specific region and local weather and climate.

Flowering stage.

Vegetative plants appreciate healthy soil with nutrients. Feed them with a higher level of nitrogen at this stage.

If you’re growing weed indoors, you can grow whenever you like. Keep in mind that the outside environment will affect your grow space—you may need to add heaters in the winter or fans and ACs in the summer. Other than that, you can start seeds whenever you like and flip them into flower whenever you like, depending on how big you want the plants.

Everything should be cleaned up, dried, and curing well before the Winter Solstice. Now’s a good time to make your own cannabutter, topicals, or tinctures with all that trim from the harvest. Kick your feet up, relax, and hunker down for the cold, it’s been a long growing season!

Harvest happens sometime between September and November. This depends on your local climate, as well as the weather that particular year—one year it could be the end of September, the next, end of October, and growers in the Pacific Northwest will have to pull down their crops earlier than those in Northern California.

The weather will start to turn and the sun will begin descending in the sky as your plants fatten up with sweet, sticky buds. It might be tempting, but wait until around the Fall Equinox to start harvesting.