starting cannabis seeds in rapid rooters

If your growing medium takes longer than 3 days for the top inch to dry, it means the soil is staying wet too long, and plant roots aren’t getting enough oxygen. It also puts your plants at risk of getting fungus gnats . Try giving less water at a time until the plant is drinking more. It’s possible you may have a problem with drainage in your medium ( what is good soil? ) or there are no drainage holes so extra water can’t come out the bottom of the container. Always remove any runoff water instead of letting the plant sit in it.

Add another plate on top to keep the paper towels from drying out. Make sure now paper towel is sticking out the sides.

This step-by-step tutorial will teach you how to germinate seeds and provide basic seedling care.

You can see some of the seeds sprouted, but some of them haven’t yet. That’s totally normal! Each seed is different. If this happens to you, you have two choices. You could plant the ones that have already sprouted and let the other ones stay in the paper towels until they germinate. Or you could just put all the seeds in Rapid Rooters now, and hope for the best as far as the slow-sprouting ones. It’s up to you. Letting the unsprouted seeds stay in the paper towels longer improves the germination rate in my experience, but it’s simpler (easier) to move them all at once.

Turn your cannabis seeds…

3.) Germination.

Here are those seedlings about 2 days later. Be extra careful when removing the paper towels. Don’t let the seeds roll around or you won’t know which is which. This is when you’ll be glad you used cheap paper towels, as they are much easier to peel off without disturbing your seedlings.

Get your containers ready before you start germinating.

After you see your first root, it’s time to…

If seeds sprout, but then stop growing…

How to Water Seedlings in the Beginning.

Gently pack the nearby soil/coco to hold the Rapid Rooter in place so the seedling is stable.

Some growers like to put seedlings in solo cups and then into their final container. When done right this can increase the rate of growth by providing more oxygen to the plant’s roots. If you go that route, I recommend paper cups as they’re not as bad for the environment.

Now it’s time to get your Rapid Rooters! Alternatively, you could place your sprouted seeds directly in the final growing medium (coco or soil). I think these help them get started, but I’ve grown many successful plants by just putting the germinated seed directly in its final home.

Don’t touch the shell if possible because a tiny tug in the wrong direction can pull the seedling out of the plug and break off the taproot.

Most seedling plugs will go back into place easily, and you’ll barely be able to tell it’s been opened. I love Rapid Rooters because their texture causes most seeds to stay in place and not “fall down” further into the hole once you’ve got the Rapid Rooter closed.

Supplies Needed.

This method is hard to mess up if you follow the instructions. Place your seeds inside a folded wet paper towel, and put that between two plates. The purpose of the plates is to prevent the seeds from drying out. Don’t let any part of a paper towel hang out the edges or it will wick away all the moisture and dry out. Keep everything totally contained between the plates.

If your seeds still aren’t sprouting and growing properly, consider the following factors.

I’ve found that pointy tweezers are perfect to pry open a shell that’s stuck. Just close the tweezer, stick it inside between the shell halves, and let it slowly open to pull the shell apart without you ever touching the seedling.

Example of cannabis seedlings growing in coco coir, about to get seedling-strength nutrient water. If they were in soil, I would give plain water for the first few weeks.

Seeds often germinate at different rates even if they get the exact same conditions.

When it comes to new growers, it seems like the most fool-proof method (at least for me, and many of the new growers who write in) is the Paper Towel Method! It’s so simple, but there’s something about wet paper towels that a young seedling loves 🙂 Learn About Other Ways to Germinate Seeds.

Seedlings “drown” and die due to lack of oxygen if they get too much water too often. To avoid this, try to provide an amount of water that lets you water seedlings every few days. Avoid giving so much water that the seedling roots are in a super wet grow medium for days as this causes “damping off” and root problems. Some grow styles like high-frequency fertigation call for watering more frequently. Just remember that the more often you water your plants, the less water you should give at a time. Also, keep in mind that a smaller container tends to dry out fast while a bigger container holds onto the water for longer.

1.) Get Cannabis Seeds.

Before you start germinating your seeds, set up your soil or coco. It will still be a few days until your seedlings arrive, but you want to have everything ready before the seedlings need to be planted.

Tips.

Try to maintain a schedule that lets you water your plants every few days without them looking droopy.

You should see a root come out the bottom in just a day or two!

You are about to water your seedlings for the first time, so prepare your water now.

If there’s no germination at all…

Cover with another wet paper towel.

Don’t use a dome on seedlings unless it’s very dry where you live. If you do use a dome, consider keeping a vent open and watching the humidity. A young seedling doesn’t require as high humidity as clones (which are what the domes are designed for), and seedlings tend to get “wet feet” and stop growing as fast in constantly wet conditions.

afterwards, make sure your plugs stay moist but not soaked all the time.

i develop a tap root first by putting them in a wet paper towel and then into a ziplock back (to hold the moisture in). Once a tap root is developed, i place them root-down carefully into the plugs about 1/4" down. Then i break off a tiny piece from the corner of the plug and gently stuff the hole [you put the seed in] so that no light gets to it. Depending on how strong the seed is from the beginning will determine if it continues it’s life cycle.

I had 14 Tutankhamen seeds and i only got 7 full developments. the others rotted and died.

If you used the starter tray that comes wrapped in the plastic, i might suggest using a hair dryer to the sides of the tray to bring the ‘bow’ out of them so when you use a humidity dome, the moisture doesn’t leak out and takes longer for the seedlings to mature.

For the most part, they can be used interchangeably. Whichever you use comes down to personal preference.

Just like rockwool, there are several great alternatives to Rapid Rooters.

And, they need to sit in something that can retain water. Once you put your seeds in Rapid Rooters and put them into a tray, they should be watered every few days until the seedling has developed.

And because starter plugs like Rapid Rooters are compact and don’t break apart easily, they can be used directly in certain hydroponic systems, unlike loose media.

If not stored properly, mold, fungi, or other pathogens can infect the product. In this case, they should be thrown out.

Do Rapid Rooters Have to Be Used For Hydroponics?

From there, it will grow into an exact genetic copy of its “mother” plant.

Here’s what I recommend:

Jiffy pellets are a name-brand starter plug made of peat moss and/or coco coir.

This isn’t a starter plug, but it can be used similarly. Just take the same tray you would normally use for plugs and fill the cells with Pro-Mix.

They are very similar, but they get the job done in slightly different ways.

Here’s how it’s done:

Because they don’t retain water well, Oasis Horticubes aren’t ideal for hydroponic methods that don’t irrigate frequently, if not, constantly.

Once your transplant is ready with lots of visible roots woven through the Rapid Rooter plug, you can pop it into a net pot or any growing media that you will be using, including perlite, expanded clay pellets, and even pure nutrient solution for deep water culture and Kratky setups.

Rapid Rooters are made of Sphagnum peat moss and a binder.

Rapid Rooter vs Rockwool.

The great thing about rockwool is how affordable it is. Compared to some of these name-brand products, rockwool can get the same job done and save you some money.

Peat moss is a soilless natural product made of decomposed organic matter, mostly Sphagnum moss.

They are made of peat moss, a soilless organic material. While peat moss is great for retaining moisture and providing plenty of air to the roots, it won’t give your plant the nutrition it needs.

The reason for this is simply that these starter plugs won’t stand very well on their own—they need some support.

Rapid Rooters.

Rapid Rooters are held together with some kind of binding foam that is invisible and biodegradable, whereas Jiffy pellets are bound with a plastic netting that isn’t biodegradable.

Do Rapid Rooters Need to Be Used With a Grow Tray?

No, Rapid Rooters do not contain any significant amount of nutrients.

Jiffy pellets are extremely similar to Rapid Rooters. They both contain peat moss (sometimes coco coir for Jiffy) bound together. The difference is what they are bound with.

Rapid Rooters are just peat moss starter plugs. General Hydroponics, the company that makes them, manufactures them in a specific way to keep them moist and compact, but other than that, they are a very simple and versatile growing tool.

Yes, Rapid Rooters can potentially go bad.

The mix contains biostimulants, which are chemicals or microorganisms that help the plant take in nutrients more efficiently or increase crop quality, as well as mycorrhizae, or beneficial fungi.

Using Rapid Rooters is super simple. You can use these starter plugs to start seeds or to propagate clones.

Peat moss is a favorite medium of gardeners around the world because of its great air-to-water ratio.