seeds in my weed

There’s a reason that marijuana is usually grown outdoors in humid, jungle-like climates!

It’s not a frequent problem if you’re buying from a trusted marijuana supplier, but it’s possible that the seed in your bud isn’t exactly the same weed strain you think it might be.

Water activates the growing enzymes within the seeds, encouraging it to strip off its protective outer layer and start creating roots to lay into the ground.

That’s okay though, you can just try again!

Take a look at your seed and make sure it’s the right color. It should be brown and entirely whole, not split apart or otherwise damaged.

#1 Knowing What You’re Getting.

A final note: Make sure you check the laws of your local area – certain municipal governments have different laws about growing marijuana when compared to just imbibing it. Make sure you’re not breaking any laws with your hand-grown marijuana – you wouldn’t want it taken away from you after all your hard work!

Once you’ve got those handy leaves, it’s time to transfer them into a bigger growing vessel. Get a common plant pot – something in the 5-gallon range is pretty standard – and fill the very bottom of it with gravel.

This gravel helps provide a good base for the soil, as well as providing drainage.

However, sometimes a marijuana plant is harvested just a bit too late. Perhaps it got the chance to develop a bit longer than it would normally, or maybe the grower was just trying something new.

Though it is rare, it’s possible you might go to all this effort of growing a marijuana plant from your bud, only to find out that it’s not the right strain at all.

It does seem rather odd, considering the prolific nature of the marijuana leaf in stoner culture – we even have images stretching back thousands of years, documented in ancient texts, of the marijuana leaf.

Even using the towel and plate method, it’s possible that around a quarter of your seeds still won’t germinate.

Regardless, the small seed of the marijuana plant is born, and it managed to make its way into your bud.

You might be tempted to jump right in and start growing your new seeds. Not so fast though, you’ve got to pick the right seeds.

Now that we know what they are, how do we choose and use them?

#2 Seed Survivability – It Might Be Too Dry!

However, the leaf isn’t actually very interesting. It just absorbs sunlight and feeds the plant. According to the United Nations report* on cannabinoid levels between both male and female plants , the large leaves of some specimens only contain about 0.3% THC and 0.7% CBD, meaning you’d be hard-pressed to get any kind of high from the leaves.

First of all, you need to understand why there are seeds in your bud to begin with.

After a few days to roughly a week, the seed will begin to spread out its roots and start to shoot up towards the sun. You’ll likely even see the very beginnings of tiny marijuana leaves!

Well, before you can consider whether or not you can plant those assorted seeds, you need to know what to look for, and how to do it.

If it’s brown and whole however, you’ve got yourself a healthy marijuana seed. Now what? Do you just plant it and watch it grow?

This is part of the reason why people generally prefer to buy their seeds from a reputable seed seller, due to the fact that you are more likely to know what you’re getting.

Once your seeds are germinated, you can plant your miniature weed plants into a small soil pot, being careful not to overcrowd them. A small quantity of high quality of soil – marijuana needs a crazy amount of nitrogen, potassium and other nutrients to flourish – in a small pot is sufficient.

Next Steps: Germinating Your Marijuana Seeds.

What happens to the seeds is that they are tricked into thinking they have been successfully buried into soil.

Keep the soil moist and allow the seeds to begin to sprout.

If it’s green or yellowish, that means the seed had only just begun to grow before it was harvested, making it little more useful than the rest of the bud for growing plants.

If you’ve followed all these steps, you’ll have managed to turn a lone seed – depressingly isolated, hiding in your bud – into a fully grown marijuana plant!

Only a few things can go wrong when you’re growing your own marijuana plants from the seeds in your bud. They’re not the worst things to ever happen, but they should definitely be considered.

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

The rest can be filled with high-quality soil and, once given adequate fertilizers, the marijuana seeds will start to grow!

To germinate a marijuana seed, it takes a little more love and care than with some other plant seeds. Firstly, take a plate or some other surface with a divot in it and lay a wet paper towel across the plate’s surface.

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

Ask yourself a few questions to decide if it’s worth the time and energy to grow the seed.

Also, buying from a reputable breeder or seed bank will give you a sense of what a particular strain will look and smell like, how it will grow, and how much it will yield at harvest.

Take four sheets of paper towels and soak them with distilled water. The towels should be soaked but shouldn’t have excess water running off.

A lot of classic weed strains that have been around for a while come in feminized form. Some popular fem seeds are:

Is the seed viable?

Most seeds that you will buy are regular seeds as described above, but here are a couple more types.

After completing these steps, it’s time to wait. Check the paper towels once a day to make sure they’re still saturated, and if they are losing moisture, apply more water to keep the seeds happy.

Additionally, every long-time grower will tell you that clones degrade over time.

To get the buds found in medical and recreational stores, female cannabis plants are grown in an environment without males—or the males are removed from the area before they release pollen—so the females don’t create seeds. Females can then focus their energies on producing buds and not seeds—this high-potency marijuana is traditionally known as “sinsemilla,” meaning “seedless.”

This is sometimes referred to as “cloning by seed” and will not produce any male plants. This is achieved through several methods:

Cannabis is grown from one of two sources: a seed or a clone. Seeds carry genetic information from two parent plants and can express many different combinations of traits: some from the mother, some from the father, and some traits from both.

Females will have a round structure with long hairs—these hairs will develop into pistils, which will catch pollen in the air.

Some seeds germinate very rapidly while others can take a while, but generally, seeds should germinate in 3-10 days. If it’s been two weeks and a seed hasn’t sprouted, it’s probably a dud and won’t sprout.

Autoflowers don’t need lots of nutrients because they’re small and don’t spend much time in the vegetative cycle. They won’t need as much veg nutrients—such as nitrogen—but will need more bloom nutrients.

If you’re ready for a more serious approach, make sure you have the space for a proper garden and pop the seeds to see what fruit they bear.

Is a bagseed good or bad?

To create a dark, protected space, take another plate and flip it over to cover the seeds, like a dome.

One way to avoid sexing plants is to buy feminized seeds (more below), which ensures every seed you plant will be a bud-producing female.

So don’t discount bud because it has a seed or two in it. While not ideal, it could be the origins of the next great weed strain.

Viable or not, there’s only one sure way to find out if a bagseed will grow. If you’re simply curious to learn and not as concerned with the overall outcome, you can plant a couple of bagseeds outside and see what happens.

Feminized cannabis seeds will produce only female plants for getting buds, so there is no need to remove males or worry about female plants getting pollinated. Feminized seeds are produced by causing the monoecious condition in a female cannabis plant—the resulting seeds are nearly identical to the self-pollinated female parent, as only one set of genes is present.

For a seed to be viable, it must be mature enough to have a completely formed genetic blueprint, and it must be strong enough to germinate and pop through its hard casing and sprout its crucial taproot.

You can also minimize headaches and avoid the hassle of seed germination and sexing plants by starting with clones.

Pros and cons of using cannabis clones.

As we’ve mentioned, cannabis is a dioecious plant, meaning male and female reproductive organs appear on different plants.

Because training happens during vegetative growth, for autoflowering plants, this period could be as short as a few weeks, which means time is limited. Try topping your autoflowers after they have three nodes, and stop once they begin to flower. You will want to prune them lightly.

However, a type of cannabis called Cannabis ruderalis , which developed in extreme northern conditions without much sunlight, will begin flowering once the plant reaches a certain age—they automatically start flowering regardless of the amount of light they receive, hence the name “autoflower.”

Growing marijuana takes a certain level of commitment: time, energy, and financial resources, so be sure you can commit to the whole process.

Many marijuana growers start autoflowers early in the season, and at a different time than a regular crop, so keep the season and climate in mind when growing and harvesting—your plants still need warmth to grow, and rain can give them bud rot. Consider growing in a greenhouse to protect them.

Cannabis seeds require three things to germinate: water, heat, and air. There are many methods to germinate seeds, but for the most common and simplest method, you will need:

Through cloning, you can create a new harvest with exact replicas of your favorite plant. Because genetics are identical, a clone will give you a plant with the same characteristics as the mother, such as flavor, cannabinoid profile, yield, grow time, etc. So if you come across a specific strain or phenotype you really like, you might want to clone it to reproduce more buds that have the same effects and characteristics.

A couple big drawbacks, though: Autoflower strains are known for being less potent. Also, because they are small in stature, they usually don’t produce big yields.

Pollen typically comes from the pollen sacs of a male cannabis plant. Male plants spray pollen everywhere when their flowers are mature. Sometimes female cannabis plants will produce pollen (known as herming) due to genetics or stress. Any source of pollen, whether the plant is male or female, can pollinate buds in the vicinity and cause seedy buds.

I’ve seen some growers get impressive results with bagseed (seeds you find), but results may be hit or miss. Plants can grow in odd ways and the yields or quality may not be as expected.

If you’ve found seeds in your buds, it happened while the plant was growing. Either the grower didn’t identify and remove all the male plants before they released pollen, or a herm was involved that self-pollinated or pollinated other buds in the grow area.

What causes seeds in buds?

These seeds have germinated.

Seedy weed is fine to smoke, though you should remove the seeds if possible (they have no THC and will pop if you smoke them). Unless there are tons of seeds, bud potency is unlikely to be affected.

What does it mean to find seeds in your marijuana buds? Is it something to be worried about?

Platinum Cookies is essentially a more potent version of the popular Girl Scout Cookies strain.

Seeds happen when pollen gets on the hairs (pistils) of buds as they’re forming. In other words, seeds in weed are caused by pollination.

There’s a seed in my cannabis bud! What does this mean? Is it good or bad?

Are “found” seeds good to grow?

Seedy buds are the result of pollination. What does that mean? Cannabis buds are flowers. Like other flowers, they make seeds when pollinated. Cannabis buds get pollinated when they come into contact with cannabis pollen while the buds are forming.

Mature cannabis seeds are typically dark brown or tan (the brown is a coating that can be rubbed off), and relatively hard. Very pale or white seeds usually won’t sprout.

Seeds in your buds aren’t good or bad. They are simply the result of pollination while the buds were growing. A few seeds here and there won’t make much difference in potency, though potency may be lower if the buds are very seedy.

That is why many growers either stick to clones (which are exactly the same as the “mother” plant) or purchase seeds of a stabilized strain from a trustworthy breeder. This ensures each of the plants will grow the way you expect, and buds more consistently have the smell, yield and potency you expect.

Does it mean the weed is bad?

However, I have been surprised to find some very flimsy or pale seeds sprout and produce amazing plants (we aren’t breeding cannabis for hard seeds after all). When in doubt, I highly recommend doing the true test to see if the seed is viable – try to germinate the seed and see if it sprouts !

This bud is full of fat seeds because pollen got on the pistils during bud development.

The biggest problem is that seeds often don’t “breed true” to the buds that they came from. The resulting buds may end up nothing like the buds you found them in.

The best way to tell if a seed is viable is simply to try germinating it.

If you’re not sure what strains to get, here are a few recommended favorites. These strains produce excellent weed and are generally easy to grow. Click the links for more information.