legal to grow marijuana in washington

Marijuana growing would also be banned in homes that provide day care services or host foster children.

Still, some new provisions have been added to the bill this year to try to address public safety and nuisance concerns.

Washington’s ban on home growing puts the state at odds with most others that have legalized recreational pot use. Of those 15 states, at least 10 allow home growing, including Oregon, Vermont, Nevada, California and Colorado. Last fall, voters in South Dakota, Arizona and Montana also approved ballot measures that legalized growing marijuana at home.

Lara Kaminsky, co-founder of the Cannabis Alliance, said she thinks allowing marijuana home growing will actually be good for the cannabis industry in Washington state. She said it could create a market for greater variety in cannabis products, much as homebrewing and microbreweries did for the beer industry.

She said many of the fears associated with allowing home growing — that it would fuel illegal activity, or create neighborhoods that constantly reek of weed — haven’t come to pass in other states.

“Our members, candidly, are not comfortable with the public safety aspects and public safety concerns associated with allowing marijuana home-grows,” said James McMahan of the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, which represents law enforcement leaders.

Washington state residents have long been able to brew their own beer in their basement, or ferment homemade wine in their living room. If they want to smoke a joint to unwind, though, their only legal option is to get dressed and buy one at a store.

For one, the measure would create a new civil infraction for anyone who grows marijuana in public view, or whose marijuana production can be “readily smelled” by neighbors or passersby. Those offenses could result in a $50 fine, but wouldn’t go on someone’s criminal record.

Timothy Nadreau, a research economist at Washington State University, said he studied how allowing marijuana home growing would affect state revenue. He concluded that cannabis tax collections would most likely continue to increase if HB 1019 passed, in part because home growing could boost people’s interest in cannabis products.

The measure passed out of the House Commerce and Gaming Committee on Friday. It would still need to pass both chambers of the Legislature — and not be vetoed by the governor — to become law.

Law enforcement officials still worry, however, that homegrown pot could be easily sold on the illicit market, or that backyard cannabis plants could prove an attractive target for thieves and burglars.

He added that most people won’t choose to cultivate cannabis at home, simply because “growing it is hard, and the product is readily available in stores.”

“It is time for us to evolve in this space,” said Kloba, the prime sponsor of the bill to allow home growing.

Under Washington state law, qualified medical cannabis patients can already grow a limited amount of marijuana plants. But for nonpatients, growing marijuana at home is a class C felony, punishable by up to five years in prison, a fine of up to $10,000, or both.

A bipartisan group of legislators is proposing a bill that would let adults 21 and over grow cannabis plants at home for recreational use.

But it’s not clear that the state’s tax collections would be hurt by allowing people to grow marijuana at home.

“I don’t see this having a significant impact on the state budget,” said state Rep. Drew MacEwen, R-Union, who is co-sponsoring the measure.

House Bill 1019 would limit each adult to six home-grown plants. No more than 15 plants could be cultivated per household, limiting the ability of roommates to band together and create a small-scale marijuana farm.

As before, selling homegrown cannabis to another person would not be allowed. Landlords could also restrict renters from growing marijuana on their property, if they choose.

As things stand now, many customers simply go for whatever pot product is cheapest and has the highest level of THC, the psychoactive component in marijuana, she said.

John Kingsbury, co-founder of the group Homegrow Washington, said many of the concerns people express about home growing seem to relate more to large-scale cannabis operations.

Right now, the state is collecting about $1 billion per year in marijuana excise tax revenues.

State Rep. Shelley Kloba, D-Kirkland, called Washington’s ban on home growing of cannabis “an antiquated policy.”

That concern was echoed by substance-abuse prevention advocates, particularly because the bill says the state Liquor and Cannabis Board wouldn’t have authority to enforce the rules that would apply to home marijuana grows.

“What I often hear is conflation of large-scale illicit activity with what we are actually advocating for here, which is legalizing six-plant, noncommercial home gardens,” Kingsbury said.

More than eight years after Washington voters legalized recreational cannabis, some state lawmakers say it’s past time to let people grow their own pot at home.

The measure has been introduced several times in the past, but has stalled. Kloba thinks that the number of states that have recently embraced home growing builds the case for Washington to do the same.

Last year, the bill died in the House Appropriations Committee, which reviews budget-related measures.

“We do not want to create an environment where adults are freely growing, producing and processing marijuana at home without any training or standardization,” said Jesse Jimenez of Prevent Coalition, an organization based in Vancouver, Washington, that works to prevent youth drug and alcohol use.

Washington legislators are considering a bill that would allow anyone age 21 and over to grow up to six marijuana plants at home. (Richard Vogel/AP)

Aside from being a medical marijuana patient, there is only one option to grow cannabis in Washington: a cultivation license.

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All of our dispensaries (even our Alaska dispensary) pride themselves in sourcing the best products from the state. The growers we work with are well-versed in creating the best plants to create a variety of cannabis products.

Will growing weed in Washington ever become legal?

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Those who have grown cannabis for medical use may legally possess up to eight ounces if they are enrolled in the database and six ounces if not. Recreational users are only allowed to possess up to an ounce at a time.

Unfortunately, Washington state is already home to a saturated cannabis market. As such, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board is not currently accepting applications for new retailers, processors, or producers.

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Our vision is to contribute to the cannabis space by continuing to challenge ourselves every day and bring inspiration and innovation to this industry. We are achieving this every day by blending the most advanced growing techniques with state-of-the-art technology and bringing our customers the best products.

All hope is not lost, though. The Washington State Legislature will not return to this topic in the 2021-2022 session but may reintroduce the topic next year. Since the proposed bill was passed for review during the 2021 session, it is not off the table for next year’s session.

Growing cannabis in Washington is not legal…usually.

Washington state has had the luxury of legal recreational cannabis since the beginning of the recreational industry in 2012. Nearly a decade later and there are still many questions regarding the rules. We often hear people ask “is growing cannabis in Washington legal?” when visiting one of our Washington dispensary locations.

While applications are not open to become a grower yourself, you can still shop at Piece of Mind Cannabis to get your hands on the best weed in the state. Whether you are looking for fresh flower, tinctures, concentrates, edibles, or any other infused product, we’ve got your back.

Know someone who grows their own weed in Washington? Before assuming they’re breaking the law, consider they may have a medical marijuana license.

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Shelley Kloba, a member of the Washington House of Representatives, sponsored HB 1019. A spokesperson for Kloba said:

SUBX (Subdued Excitement)

“we grow and sell cannabis exclusively in washington state…near canada.

As officials in states that permit marijuana cultivation can tell you, these fears are often unfounded. Allowing residents to grow their own personal-use cannabis has not caused any neighborhoods to collapse.

Your average 21+ year-old is not permitted to grow weed plants in their backyard or hallway closet. In fact, cultivating marijuana for personal use is prohibited in the state. This is a surprise to many out-of-state visitors who come from other legal states where home cultivation is permitted under certain terms.

“It makes no sense that you can be charged with a felony for growing a plant whose derivative products you can buy at a store…This bill will correct an injustice in our system and give people the freedom to grow small amounts of cannabis on their own property.”

Medical marijuana patients in Washington state are permitted to grow up to six plants for medical use. If there are multiple qualified patients in one household, up to 15 plants are allowed.

Brand for Everyone – Buddies™ is a West Coast Cannabis Brand rooted to the core elements of cannabis. With over 20 years experience in cultivation and processing, Buddies™ understands the craftsmanship that’s pushed the evolution of our industry to what we all know it to be today.

Tier One: less than two thousand square feet. Tier Two: two thousand square feet to 10 thousand square feet. Tier Three: 10 thousand square feet to 30 thousand square feet.

One nice thing about growing marijuana (as opposed to selling it as a retailer) is that you don’t have to sweat finding the most convenient place for customers. In fact, for security purposes, an out-of-the-way location can be a bonus. This can make it a little easier to abide by the state’s zoning requirements.

In a perfect world, you could start a brand new marijuana grow business and choose the business entity type that’s the best fit for you. Unfortunately, the WSLCB isn’t currently accepting applications for new marijuana producer licenses.

For more information on differences between an LLC and a corporation, click here .

You must keep extensive record of all inventories and upload records in the state’s database. The following needs to be kept completely up-to-date in the system:

What kind of security requirements does Washington have for cannabis grow facilities?

Not currently. The number of licenses is capped, and the WSLCB isn’t opening up applications for new licenses anytime in the foreseeable future.

It’s not all bad news though—you can invest in or buy an already-licensed marijuana grow business. Over a thousand producer licenses have been issued in Washington to different types of businesses. Before investing in or buying a business, it’s important to understand and carefully consider the impact that a business’s entity type will have on your operations.

Originally, I-502 rules dictated that all financiers must be Washington residents, living in-state for at least three months. Legislative changes have relaxed somewhat since then. It’s possible to apply to the WSLCB to accept funds from an out-of-state financier. You’ll have to submit an Application for Additional Funding to the WSLCB and receive approval. Out-of-state financiers have to be US residents.

No. While you can hold both producer and processor licenses, retail is always separate. You can’t hold a retailer license AND a producer or processor license.

Registered agents are required for any business entity registered with the Secretary of State. When you hire Northwest Registered Agent as your registered agent, it’s a flat rate yearly price of $125 a year. You’ll have an online account that tracks your report due dates and when your yearly service with us is up. Any documents we receive locally for you are uploaded into your account immediately for complete viewing. If or when you get served with a lawsuit, we can email up to 4 people and your attorney at the same time for real-time complete viewing of a lawsuit. You’ll receive annual report reminders as well. Our service is the same price every year, and there are no weird fees or cancellation fees.

Yes, but only to other licensees for the purpose of negotiating a sale. All samples given away must be logged into the traceability database. You can only give away 4 grams per month to any one licensee.

Yes, but you can only sample one gram of usable marijuana per month. The sampler must either be you or one of your employees. The sampling must be logged into the traceability database.

If you don’t use at least 50% of the square footage afforded to you, the WSLCB may knock you down a tier.

In order to get or maintain a marijuana producer license, the rules require that your grow shop has planned protocol for each of the following:

Step 3: Get the Money.

Step 4: Choose a Business Entity.

Washington has very particular rules about where you can legally produce marijuana. Even if you’re buying a business and keeping its current location, it’s important to keep current on the laws. You never know when you’ll want (or need) to upgrade your location.

If your business operates as a corporation, you will benefit from limited liability as well. The personal assets of shareholders who have purchased stock are usually only responsible for their own stock investments. The corporation, since it is considered its own separate business entity apart from shareholders and owners, is legally responsible for itself. Debts, etc. do not fall onto the shoulders of individuals, but rather onto the corporation as a whole, separate entity. A corporation’s corporate veil can also be pierced, so you need to take in the same considerations as with an LLC when deciding which entity is right for your cannabis business.

If you’re considering a sole proprietorship, realize that you personally will have unlimited liability. You are the business. There is no legal separation between you and your personal assets and the assets of your business. What this means for you is that you are personally responsible for all debts or actions on behalf of your business. Your assets are on the line in the case of a lawsuit or unpaid bills.

In July 2018, the fee dropped from $1480 to $1381. New applications aren’t currently being accepted, but if applications open again, note that there is also a nonrefundable application fee of $250.

No government authority will be kind to you if you start growing cannabis without meeting all the requirements. Before flicking on your grow lights, the top regulatory requirement on your list needs to be obtaining a marijuana producer license. If you’ve completed the previous four steps, you should be in a good position.

Can I buy a Washington marijuana producer license from an existing business?

Once you’ve decided you want to grow cannabis to sell for recreational use in Washington, you need to hammer out a business plan. This plan should include your financing, market analysis, marketing plan, operations plan, as well as what will separate your cannabis from the competition. If you plan on buying an existing business, learn everything you can about the company and its current processes. Take your time—there are still many unknowns in the relatively new recreational marijuana market. Study the new laws and make sure your plans fall within the bounds of the state’s rules.

Not exactly. The licenses themselves aren’t transferable assets—a business can’t buy or sell a license to another business. You can, however, purchase a business entity that holds a license. When investing in or buying an already-licensed business, be sure to file a Change in Governing People, Percentage Owned and/or Stock/Unit Ownership form ($75) with the WSLCB. You may also have to submit forms (which vary depending on business entity) to the Secretary of State indicating changes in governors and owners.

We can serve as your Washington registered agent and receive all official mail and service of process, as well as keep you up to date on all that is required to keep your business entity active.

Yes. Washington requires that you carry a commercial general liability insurance policy provided by a carrier with a rating of no less than A—Class VII. The WSLCB has to be listed as an additional insured on all of your general liability, umbrella, and excess insurance policies.

Some counties and municipalities have permits just for the privilege of being a marijuana business. For example, the City of Kenmore charges $500 a year for their annual Marijuana Business License.

RCW 69.50.385 gave the WSLCB board the authority to create a licensing procedure so that common carriers can transport marijuana and marijuana products from one licensed facility to another. In other words, the person who drives your bud harvest to the processor needs to get a license from the WSLCB. The Marijuana Transportation License fee is $250.

No, but the state has allotted that only so many square feet may be used in growing marijuana. It has set the initial limit at two million square feet. The kind of producer license you have will determine how many square feet of space you can use to grow cannabis. The state has broken quantities down into three tiers: