iceberg seeds

Days to Maturity: Lettuce can be picked whenever real leaves form. Pick when the leaves are younger rather than waiting so the taste doesn’t become bitter. (See each variety for days to maturity)

"Agriculture and seeds" provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, we pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants.

Planting: For direct seeding, seeds germinate at low soil temperatures (40°F), but poorly above 75°F. Sow seeds 2-3″ apart, rows 12–18″ apart. Cover seed lightly, about 1/8″, and firm soil gently. Thin iceberg and romaine lettuce to one plant every 10–12″, other types 8–10″ for full size heads or 6″ for mini heads. Dry soil must be watered to ensure coolness and moisture, and for uniform germination. For transplanting, sow 2-3 seeds per cell, 1/4″ deep, 3-4 weeks before transplanting outdoors. Do not let soil above 70F while germinating so keep out of sun and a cool, dark location. Harden seedlings by reducing water and temperature for 2–3 days before planting outdoors. Properly hardened transplants can survive temperatures as low as 20°F. Transplant iceberg and romaine lettuce 10–12″ apart, in rows 18″ apart. Other types 8–10″ apart in rows 12–18″ apart for full size heads or 6″ apart for mini heads.

Tips: Plant lettuce near taller plants, like tomatoes, so the leaves are in the shade during the hot parts of the day.

Lettuce is a cool-season crop, and seedlings can tolerate a light frost. Lettuce grows quickly, so stagger the plantings. It is recommended to sow the lettuce seeds directly into the garden as soon as the soil can be worked.

Shipping Schedule.

Before Planting: Lettuce is hardy and can be planted as early as the soil can be worked. It is a cool weather crop and grows best at temperatures of 60-65°F. Careful variety selection is important for hot weather plantings. Sow every 3 weeks for a continuous supply of fresh lettuce. Lettuce seed can enter thermal dormancy when exposed to high temperatures. Do not use a heat mat when germinating lettuce seed. Optimum germination results at soil temperatures of 60–65°F.

Fertilizer: Lettuce is typically a care-free plant, but you can fertilize the soil with an organic fertilizer one week prior to planting the seeds. Lettuce grows best in soil that is high in humus. Fertilize three weeks after transplanting seedlings with an alfalfa meal or a slow-release fertilizer.

Harvesting: For heads of lettuce, cut the plant at the soil line to harvest it. For leaf lettuces, you can harvest the entire plant or only the outer leaves as needed. Harvest in the morning. Store in cool, dark and high humidity location for up to 2-3 weeks.

Watering: Water lettuce once to twice per week or every 4 days whenever rainfall is inadequate.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, to genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately to healthy people and communities.

Our Seed Promise.

Start by sowing the non-GMO seeds 1/2 inch in soil, twelve inches apart, in rows eighteen inches apart. Make sure to allow enough space between seeds for the lettuce to grow, as overcrowding can cause the lettuce to have a bitter taste. Firm the soil lightly. While growing, keep the soil well watered. Harvest 70 to 79 days after planting.

70-79 days. These non-GMO Iceberg seeds grow into green heads of lettuce that are ready to harvest in 70 to 79 days. The Iceberg lettuce is one of the most popular varieties of crisphead lettuce, and can be grown in zones 4-9. The leaves of the Iceberg have a mildly sweet flavor. Approx 16,000 seeds per oz.

Crisphead Iceberg Lettuce (Lactuca sativa), is also known as Crisphead lettuce. Iceberg Lettuce is the one of the most popular types of crisphead lettuce, and has been a favorite for many years. Its popularity is due to its crisp, juicy texture. While not known for its impactful flavor, iceberg lettuce has a subtle, sweet taste. It is used in salads, on sandwiches, and as a garnish. Iceberg lettuce is an annual grown in zones 4-9. They prefer cooler weather, but need sunlight to grow properly. If they heat up too fast, or too early, iceberg lettuce could prematurely bolt, or go to seed. They are best when harvested just before this point, when the inner leaves are firm. Heat can also cause splitting or rotting, so start lettuce in the early spring so it can be harvested before the high heat of summer. Iceberg lettuce has been a staple vegetable for many years, and is a great addition to any garden.

Select a Different Use for This Seed:

Growing Iceberg Lettuce Garden Seeds.

Harvest your organic lettuce when the outer leaves are about 6” long. This ensures that the plant will survive after the leaves are removed. You can use your hands to tear off the leaves anywhere on the stalk once the leaves are long enough. Continue to harvest lettuce leaves until you are left with a center stalk. It may take as long as 80 days after planting to harvest. If you’re harvesting heads of lettuce, cut the head 1” away from the soil. A new head should form in its place.

Plant seeds ¼” to ½” deep in your favorite seed starting mix, or directly outside in your prepared beds. Start inside 4-6 weeks before your last frost date in spring, or 4 weeks early before planting out in fall. Try to situate your planting area where your plants will get 4-8 hours of sunlight a day. Heading-type lettuce will need sun closer to the 8 hours and leaf lettuces will do okay with at least 4 hours.

Prepare your garden beds or containers with well-drained and nutrient-rich soil that is full of compost or aged manure. Lettuce plants do well in steady amounts of nitrogen, so apply blood meal or compost tea to the soil before planting.

Yes, THAT Iceburg lettuce! We think this crispy delight has an undeserved bad reputation. High in folate and vitamins A & C, Iceburg just is not the nutritional flop folks think it is. Try it again and you’ll see! We think Iceburg might just become America’s favorite lettuce again.

Thin your plants once the seedlings have formed their first real leaves. Thinning is simply removing certain seedlings to allow your plants to spread out. Leaf lettuce seedlings should be 4” apart while heads of lettuce should be 6 -8” apart. If you’re growing organic lettuce heads, such as iceberg, aim for 12-14” apart. Single-leaf lettuce plants should be 4” apart.

Lettuce, Lactuca sativa Pollination, self; Life Cycle, annual; Isolation Distance, 20 feet Lettuce is a great choices for those new to seed saving, because it has a perfect flower and only needs 20 feet between varieties to stay true. Save seeds from several plants of the same variety to ensure diversity. Allow plant to bolt and flower, you will know the seeds are ready to harvest when yellow flowers dry to a white fluff. Let the seed heads dry on the plant if possible, but if it’s too wet you can pull the plant up roots and all and allow to dry upside down in a cool, dry place. Use a small diameter screen to separate seed from chaff, or separate seeds by hand.