how to stop weeds growing in garden bed

If your flower bed is completely overrun with weeds, consider using a non-selective weed killer with the active ingredient Glyphosate, Rubert says.

Overlap the edges 4-5 inches to discourage weeds from growing in between.

Vinegar might kill your weeds, but it can kill surrounding good plants, too.

This could be a pain, too, when it’s time to replace bark or rock, because the decomposing paper will be in the way.

Pro tip: Keep your Preen handy when you put down fabric weed barrier (see below) to control any ungerminated seeds that may be lurking there.

Weeding by Hand.

Spreading a layer of newspaper will starve the soil of sunlight temporarily, but the newsprint will completely biodegrade within a year.

But this isn’t your best option if there are a lot of existing perennials or shrubs. The weed killer will kill them, too.

Good old-fashioned pulling weeds gives you instant results, Rubert says.

Pro Tip: A non-selective weed killer with the active ingredient Glyphosate, will kill any part of the weed left behind after pulling them out by hand.

The fabric goes down right on top of your topsoil.

Pro Tip: when Rubert says fabric, she means fabric. Don’t use plastic. Water can’t penetrate it.

Seeds may blow in on top of the fabric and germinate in the mulch on top of it, Rubert says, but these stray weeds are much easier to pluck out by hand because they’re just sitting on top — their roots have no soil base.

And don’t use it where you’re planting annuals.

The weed barrier fabric starves the soil of sunlight and will stop weeds from growing underneath it and keep seeds from germinating in the soil.

Pre-emergent Weed Killer.

Pro tip: Save the vinegar for your salad dressing.

Many weeds also have very long root systems, making it difficult to remove the entire root.

And it will take a lot of vinegar to do the job, which can actually change your soil pH. That means you’ll starve any flowers or plants of nutrients they need, such as nitrogen, potassium, and phosphate.

A good weed is a dead weed. An even better weed is one that never shows up in the first place.

Your grandmother may have shared this way to prevent weeds, but it’s not a long-term solution.

A pre-emergent weed preventer, such as Preen, or Snapshot is a great way to prevent weeds when seeds haven’t yet germinated, Rubert says.

Newspaper as Weed Barrier.

It also won’t kill the weed down to the root, so you’ll have to reapply it often.

“These aren’t a solid option,” Rubert says.

It zeros in only on ungerminated seeds, so it won’t hurt any plant material that‘s already growing.

This is the best way to prevent weeds in flower beds, Rubert says.

That’s why we asked landscape designer Kim Rubert how she tackles these pesky garden invaders.

“You’ll be digging up annual beds a lot,” she says. “You might have to weed a little bit, but annual beds will get thick pretty fast, so weeds aren’t much of an issue.”

But when you yank a weed by hand, it often breaks off, leaving the root behind. That means it will quickly re-sprout.

If the bottom of the bed was not lined with a weed barrier, or if the barrier has begun to degrade, weeds can be stopped from the top as well. Landscape fabric or newspaper layers can be used between rows of edible or ornamental crops. The layers can be covered with organic mulch, if you wish. Alternately, organic mulch alone, spread to a depth of 2 to 3 inches around plants and between rows, will deter many weeds, as well as helping conserve soil moisture.

The best way to keep weeds from growing up through raised beds is to stop them at the bottom. Before construction begins on the bed, the soil underneath can be treated by a process called soil solarization, which heats soil to a point where many pathogens and weed seeds are destroyed. To solarize soil, cover the bed area with a sheet of heavy, clear plastic, weighted to keep it from blowing away. Keep the plastic in place for at least two months during the hottest part of summer, before removing it to build the bed.

Raised bed gardening is a way to make it easier to reach garden beds, overcome poor soil and provide maximum yields of food crops in minimal space. The beds may be raised as little as 6 to 8 inches or as much as several feet, but elevation alone cannot prevent weed seeds from finding their way in. Weeds sometimes work their way up from underlying soil, but may also land on the bed, borne by wind or other means.

If soil solarization is not a viable strategy, it is still possible to stop weeds before they grow. Before filling a raised bed with soil, line the bottom with landscape fabric, which you can buy at nurseries and garden centers. The fabric is long-lasting and porous, allowing water to pass through while stopping weeds from growing up through it. Though the fabric may be pierced by over-enthusiastic digging, and will eventually break down, it should deter weeds for several years. Though not as long-lasting, newspaper, overlapped and laid several layers thick, can also line the raised bed’s bottom.

Despite soil solarization and weed barriers above and below, a few weeds will persist in sprouting, especially close to planting holes where the soil has been disturbed and barriers pierced to allow plant growth. Weed seeds sometimes arrive on the wind or are present in the soil mix. Beds should be no more than 4 feet wide to make elimination of these weeds possible without stepping on and compacting the soil. Check for weeds regularly. Weeding is most effective when the intrusive plants are young and easy to uproot, but should always be done before they flower and set seed.

Additional Barriers.

Weed Barriers.

Soil Solarization.

The old saying “Pull when wet; hoe when dry” is wise advice when facing down weeds. After a drenching rain, stage a rewarding weeding session by equipping yourself with gloves, a sitting pad, and a trug or tarp for collecting the corpses. As you head out the door, slip an old table fork into your back pocket because there’s nothing better for twisting out tendrils of henbit or chickweed. When going after bigger thugs, use a fishtail weeder to pry up taprooted weeds, like dandelion or dock.

Few experiences compare to the joy of watching weeds shrivel in the sun after a morning weeding session, but then what should you do with them? Their best resting place, of course, is a compost pile or bin, which is the end of the story if the weeds going in are free of seeds. In reality, however, a good half of the weeds you pull probably hold seeds. Separating the seedies from other weedies is impractical, so weed seeds in compost are customarily killed by raising the temperature in the heap.

Thank you for the tips. The weeds in my garden seem to grow in the blink of an eye. I spend a lot of time weeding my garden, only to see weeds popping up a week later. I might need to call a weed control service.

2. Mulch, mulch, mulch.

If you were to track every hour spent in your garden, you would probably find that you do an inordinate amount of weeding. And while the first few weeks of tearing up these intruders can prove mildly satisfying, the chore soon wears thin. Even more maddening—you are just six simple strategies away from your garden not needing weeds anymore.

In lawns, minimize soil disturbance by using a sharp knife with a narrow blade to slice through the roots of dandelions and other lawn weeds to sever their feed source rather than digging them out. Keep in mind that weed seeds can remain dormant for a long, long time.

Some light passes through chunky mulches, and often you will discover—too late—that the mulch you used was laced with weed seeds. It’s important to replenish the mulch as needed to keep it about 2 inches deep (more than 3 inches deep can deprive soil of oxygen). In any case, you can set weeds way back by covering the soil’s surface with a light-blocking sheet of cardboard, newspaper, or biode­gradable fabric and then spreading prettier mulch over it.

Does 32 ounces of vinegar mixed with 1/4 ounce of soap sound like an accurate mix.

Put drought on your side by depriving weeds of water. Placing drip or soaker hoses beneath mulch efficiently irrigates plants while leaving nearby weeds thirsty. In most climates, depriving weeds of water reduces weed-seed germination by 50 to 70 percent. Watch out, though, for the appearance of deeply rooted perennial weeds, such as bindweed and nutsedge, in areas that are kept moist. They can take off in a flash when given the benefits of drip irrigation.

Beyond these strategies, enriching your soil with organic matter every chance you get can move your garden along down the weed-free path. Soil scientists aren’t sure how it works, but fewer weed seeds germinate in soil that contains fresh infusions of good compost or organic matter. One theory makes elegantly simple sense: When soil is healthy and well fed, weed seeds sense that they are out of a job and are less likely to appear.

Monday: Kill weeds. Tuesday: Kill weeds …

I’m hoping to get my garden under control. I was thinking about laying down some weed killer, then use some landscaping fabric. Would some mulch installation be good on top of the fabric?

I find fabric just gets in the way. The weeds will root on top of the soil regardless of whether fabric is down or not. I find a good layer of mulch, 3-4 inches thick, weeding by hand, making sure to get the roots, works best. Mulch will feed the plants as it breaks down, keep the bed cool, and retain moisture when it rains.

Great post! These interesting tips and suggestions will do good to every gardener. I did a post too on managing a garden. I hope it may be of some help here. You can read it here:

thanks this was very helpful and had no mention of statues.

5. Mind the gaps between plants.

When you can’t remove weeds, the next best thing is to chop off their heads. With annual weeds, dead­heading buys you a few weeks of time before the weed “seed rain” begins. Cutting back the tops of perennial weeds, like bindweed, reduces reseeding and forces them to use up food reserves and exhaust their supply of root buds, thus limiting their spread.

I’ve had a heck of a time with this spiky low pinwheel weed for the past three years at our home. I’ve spent most of my summer pulling these things out by the root (or trying to), and my poor fingers have been spiked to the nubs. Found out recently that they’re Canada thistle, and read that the most effective way of getting rid of them is to cut them off at the ground, not pull them up by the roots. If one little bit of root is left behind, it’ll grow back. But if you force the plant to regrow its leaves it’ll eventually use up all of its energy and die.

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The one more thing that is not mentioned is landscape fabric. I consider it quite effective and list its advantages at my site https://gardeningadviser.com/

Good point about minding the gaps. Proper placement of plants is one of the best natural weed control methods. http://www.gardenerhack.com/5-weed-control-hacks-weed-free-garden/