how to grow high dro weed

If you’re looking to grow your own cannabis plant, consider a Pot for Pot’s all natural complete soil growing kits .

Although initially it was meant for just vegetables and garden plants, it was soon realized that this is a smart method of growing weed / marijuana.

It lets you supervise the factors that affect the growth and quality of the plant along with its yield. This can lead to the production of higher quality weed than plants grown normally. However, all that supervision and care creates more work and cost for the grower, and allows for more things to go wrong during the grow.

Benefits of Growing Weed Hydroponically.

This high quality is achieved because the hydroponic system makes complete use of water, nutrients, and the growing space efficiently.

Hydroponics reduces the risk of plant disease and pest infestations , as a result of which you don’t need to use a lot of pesticides. This leads to the creation of a product that is much safer for medical marijuana patients.

There is one reason in particular why some consider growing weed hydroponically better than soil-grown weed. That reason is yield. Hydroponics, when done correctly, can yield about 20% more than soil grown weed. That’s why it’s the preferred option for commercially grown medical marijuana. Here are the several benefits of growing weed hydroponically:

Cannabis, or weed, has the ability to grow almost anywhere, be it under different climates or varying conditions. In fact, growing weed at home has a lot of pretty straightforward approaches, and one of the ways to do it is by using hydroponics.

It’s only the availability of light that limits the plant’s density in a hydroponic growth room. Quicker maturity also leads to an overall higher yield. If ideal conditions are maintained, growers can even choose to harvest about four to five times a year.

Hydroponic weed is the method of growing weed such that each plant grows in a flow or bath of water that is heavily oxygenated and highly enriched with beneficial nutrients . No soil is used in this process, and instead, the plant grows in a sterile, inert growing medium. All of the nutrients required for the weed to grow are mixed in a solution in the water in which the growth process takes place. This unique method of growing plants took birth over a century ago when it was created by William Frederick Gericke.

The plants take in their required nutrition both from the water and the air, therefore, it’s necessary to maintain a perfect atmosphere in your hydroponic system.

How to Set Up a Hydroponic System to Grow Weed.

The hydroponic method allows you to produce higher yields of weed from a particular plot size, which is a huge advantage when compared to soil-based cultivation when growing commercially. However, this yield increase is negligible when growing smaller, personal amounts of cannabis.

If you have limited space, hydroponics can be a good option for you. Since hydroponic weed can be grown in your bedroom or inside a closet, space is less of an issue. Though with autoflowering cannabis and a quality soil grow kit , high quality weed can be grown naturally in very little space, and at less cost.

Of the reasons why hydroponic weed is sometimes preferred, one of the top-most is that it allows you to have weed of the highest quality, without having to wait for the most ideal environmental conditions for growing it outdoors.

Because of this, hydroponic marijuana can benefit patients with cancer and AIDS because a regular intake of chemically contaminated marijuana can cause several unwanted side-effects. Of course, you can also avoid harmful pesticides and other nasty stuff by growing weed at home , whether hydroponically or in soil.

As you can tell, growing hydroponically can get complicated and expensive. That’s why we recommend growing with natural soil, especially for beginners.

Hydroponics reduces the risk of diseases.

Want to grow pot indoors? Check out these grow pots for weed!

As hydroponics allows you to grow weed indoors, you can have much more control over the environment than you would have outdoors.

In a hydroponic system, the plants don’t need to expend energy growing big root webs to absorb the nutrients. This is because they are set up so that they are able to consume all the nutrients directly.

The word “hydroponics” is derived from Latin that literally translates to “water working”.

Our complete grow kits include everything you need to go from seed to your very own supply of high grade medical cannabis.

Hydro is a no-brainer for me. Whenever I go back to a hand-watered grow like coco coir, I am always surprised by how much extra time it takes to water plants and remove the runoff. The most intimidating part of hydro is just getting started – after that it’s actually really easy to take care of your plants. In my opinion, hydro is far easier and less time consuming than growing in soil or coco coir once you’re set up. If you are interested in hydro, go for it! If you follow this tutorial you will succeed!

How to Grow Cannabis in DWC.

Hydroponics is when you grow your cannabis plant in an inert medium like coco or a reservoir of water, and provide all the nutrients to the plant directly in the water.

So there are five major parts to getting set up. You need….

Today I’ll teach you how to set up your hydroponic reservoir for growing cannabis, and I’ll show you what you need to do each day for optimum growth 🙂

Cons of Hydro.

When it comes to hydroponic cannabis…

Have you seen cannabis plants growing with their roots just floating in a reservoir of water? This type of hydroponics is known as Deep Water Culture (DWC), and has been around for over a 100 years! As more growers gain experience with this medium, DWC has become increasingly popular for growing cannabis. Hydroponic setups are really neat and offer some big benefits over growing in soil!

Growing in coco coir can be considered a type of hydroponics since it naturally contains no nutrients and you must provide all the nutrients in the water. However, when you say “hydroponics” most people think of this:

Differences Between Soil & Hydro.

Is Hydroponics Good for Growing Cannabis?

Pros of Hydro.

Benefits of Hydro Over Soil.

Cons of Hydro.

Once you’ve got your gear and supplies, it’s time to get set up and start growing! Here’s a quick overview.

That said, when your plants are fully flowering, you might find yourself watering them daily, based on these indicators. When you do water them, keep going until you see water running off the soil, to ensure the water reaches all of the soil in the pot.

There are different harvesting methods, but Johnson cuts the whole plant at the base and hangs it upside down with some twine in a dark room at a temperature of around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Add a fan for airflow — you definitely don’t want the room to be humid, which will cause mold to grow, rendering your crop unusable. It’ll probably take around a week to dry.

When the pandemic hit, many of us turned to quaint pastimes to soothe our existential dread, whether it was baking sourdough, knitting, or doing jigsaw puzzles. If you want to expand your repertoire of distraction methods with an activity that still has that quiet, homey vibe, but with a bit more of an edge, consider growing your own weed.

To check if your cannabis is ready for trimming, perform a break test on each branch. If it bends so much it nearly breaks, then it’s ready, and if it breaks right away, it might be overly dry, but still totally usable. Trim off the buds and seal them inside a mason jar for curing, opening it periodically over the course of about four weeks to let moisture escape. Johnson outlines a detailed schedule on his website, including instructions on how to look for mold.

Your cannabis will be ready to harvest at around October. You’ll know they’re ready when the buds “start to get really, really swollen and packed pretty tight,” Johnson says. But it can be hard to tell if you’re a beginner. Many growers say that if you think your plant is ready to harvest, wait two weeks, since many newbies tend to harvest too early. Or, you could share a photo of your crop on a forum and ask more experienced growers to weigh in.

Upkeep.

If you buy seeds from a seed bank, look for those labeled “feminized” to ensure they give rise to female plants, Johnson says. But if you’re a total newbie, he suggests buying clones, which are cuttings from a “mother” female plant, available at some dispensaries, as well as at nurseries. Not only are they easier to obtain, “they’re easier to grow. You get a clone, and you transplant it to some soil.”

Cannabis cultivation laws vary widely state-by-state. Also, we can’t stress this enough: Growing cannabis is illegal in a lot of places, and the penalties — which include steep fines and prison time — can be much worse than possession, since growing can imply an intent to distribute. Black and brown folx need to be especially scrupulous about heeding these rules, since law enforcement targets us way more than white people for weed-related charges, even if we consume it at similar rates.

Whatever you do, don’t plant your clones in the ground. They’ll run rampant, and “you’ll have pounds of weed in your house,” Johnson says, recalling the trays of weed atop his kitchen table when his crop grew wild. “You don’t need the stress of plants getting out of control, growing over your fence.” If your neighbors can see them, they might complain about them, and having too many plants could get you arrested.

Do your homework and read up on the laws in your state. Some states prohibit growing cannabis, while others, like my home state of California, permits anyone over age 21 to grow cannabis, but only up to a certain number of plants. NORML has a pretty in-depth guide to the laws in each state. Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, Vermont, and Maine also allow cultivation, but again, the specifics depend on the state. Definitely clarify what your rights are before you start the glorious path to at-home bud gardening.

Cannabis plants can be either male or female. Female plants yield the plump flowers, a.k.a., “buds,” that we know and love, brimming with psychoactive compounds like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, which gets you high), Modern Farmer explains. Male plants yield much smaller flowers, which people typically don’t consume. In other words, if you want to actually indulge in your crop, you’ll want female plants.

Johnson notes that the outdoor grow season lasts from around April to October, meaning if you plant seeds now, they’d still yield flower, but not much. Since it’s late in the season, he suggests buying a large clone, which will have more branches and therefore yield more flower.

Don’t go overboard, though, he warns. Start with growing three plants in five-gallon pots. This way, if one dies, you’ll still have two plants, and the pots will limit their growth. A general rule of thumb is that they’ll grow one foot for every gallon of soil. He recommends mixing your own organic soil, which he explains how to do on his website and will save you the headache of adding nutrients or pH testing. “The soil is what we call alive,” he says. “It’s always breaking things down to replenish nutrients that are missing.” But if you can’t mix your own soil, or don’t feel like it, you could buy organic Pro-Mix soil, which Johnson says many outdoor growers use.

Since clones come from plants that have been grown indoors, let yours chill in a shaded area for a week before exposing them to full sun, Johnson says. “The clone hasn’t tasted sun like that, and the transplant itself will be stressful.”

If you use organic soil, all you’ll really need to do is add water, Johnson says — but don’t overdo it. The number one mistake he sees new growers make is watering their plants too often. In general, “watering every day is too much. The rule is, if you pick up your plant, and the pot is heavy, then it has a enough water. If it’s light, it’s dry, then you need to water.” You could also stick your finger knuckle-deep into the soil; if it feels dry, add water.

While you can absolutely grow cannabis indoors, outdoor cultivation is much simpler and cheaper, says Ron Johnson, author of How to Grow Organic Cannabis: A Step-by-Step Guide for Growing Marijuana Outdoors , who also runs the website The Cannabis Gardener. “The sun is free,” he tells Mic. “You don’t have to pay hundreds of dollars a month in electrical bills.” An outdoor garden probably won’t allow you to turn over product fast enough, but it’ll suffice if you just want to grow weed for yourself. Plus, it’s gentler on the planet.

Planting.

Once you’ve cured your cannabis, sprinkle some bud in a bowl, or whatever your preferred method of imbibing might be, and savor your hard-earned crop.

Before you get started.