growing weed in water

Plants are ready to transplant when a healthy root structure encompasses most of the soil and the roots aren’t bound. When transplanting, take time to look at the quality of the roots: Bright white roots with a strong, thick structure is a sign plants are getting watered correctly.

If growing in amended organic soil, it is not recommended to flush plants. This is because the soil already holds all the nutrients the plant needs to thrive, and by flooding the soil you can wash away and damage the complex ecosystem that you’ve worked hard to develop.

The amount of water your marijuana plants need depends on a few factors:

By looking at the trichomes on marijuana plants, you’ll be able to tell when the plants are ready for a flush—begin when they start turning milky.

There isn’t an exact science for watering a weed plant. You can’t observe the roots in most cases to see if they need water. Also, a plant is constantly growing and the climate it’s in will fluctuate, so the amount of water it needs constantly changes.

How to flush weed plants.

Flushing is an important part of the marijuana growing process, when you stop giving a marijuana plant nutrients and give it straight water. This is done to flush out nutrients that may have built up in a plant during its life.

When you find the sweet spot between too wet and too dry, your plants will flourish.

Conversely, if a container is too small, the roots won’t be able to stretch out, which can stunt the growth of a plant. Less soil also meant you’ll need to water the plant all the time, which will add labor.

Leaves of an overwatered plant look slightly similar in that they droop, except the leaves will be dark green and the leaf tips will be curled.

The final flush should occur for a week or so before you cut down weed plants for harvesting. Water your plants with the same amount as you normally would, but only with water. This will force the plant to use the nutrients stored within it—if its nutrient reserves are not used or broken down, it could affect the quality of your harvested buds.

Below are general estimates and are meant to give growers a rough sense of frequency of waterings; if a plant needs water and it falls outside of these ranges, water it.

Here are some tried-and-true tips to keep your weed plants healthy and properly hydrated.

Flushing is done for about a week before harvest, at the end of a plant’s flowering stage when buds are almost ready to cut down.

Note how often you water plants and write it down in a log. Get your marijuana plants on a watering schedule—as they grow out of the seedling stage, watering every two to three days is ideal.

When growing weed outdoors, you’ll need to water more often as the weather gets hotter and less often as it cools.

Flushing marijuana plants before harvest.

To properly water a cannabis plant, it needs to be in the correct size container, or a big enough hole if it’s in the ground. If a pot is too big, the plant’s roots can’t drink water where they don’t reach. If the roots aren’t absorbing water, water will sit in soil and take a long time to evaporate, which can promote root rot and unwanted insects and fungus.

A common mistake first-time growers make is to overwater marijuana plants. A cycle of wet and dry is healthy and necessary for the roots of a plant to grow out and reach deeper into the soil.

Different growing mediums require different flushing timeframes before harvest:

Additionally, roots pull in oxygen as soil dries and when soil is too wet, the plant can’t pull in oxygen efficiently and essentially can’t breathe.

Roots are constantly on the hunt for water as they grow and stretch out. As a plant gets bigger, so should the watering radius—the area around the stalk of the plant that you water. Doing this will help guide roots to the edges of the pot as they seek available nutrients in soil.

If a weed plant is very dry, water will run straight through the soil and pot and quickly come out the drainage holes. If this happens, water the plant a little bit and then come back to it after 15-20 minutes and water it again, and maybe even a third time. This allows the soil to slowly absorb water until all of it is thoroughly wet.

An under-watered marijuana plant looks droopy and weak, with yellow or brown leaves; there is no strength in the leaves and they look lifeless.

How much should you water marijuana plants?

Ideally, cannabis plants should start in a small pot and progress to bigger and bigger pots as they outgrow each container. For example, you can start a seedling or clone in a 4″ or 1-gallon pot, then move on to a 2-gallon, 5-gallon, 10-gallon, and so on.

The best ways to tell if a weed plant needs water is to:

Watering too far away from the roots can create standing water, which can lead to root rot, mold, and pest issues.

You want to water a plant enough to soak all the soil in the pot. Water should pool up on the surface of the soil when you’re watering, and come out the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot after a couple seconds. If water sits on the surface of the soil, that means it’s too wet and doesn’t need more water.

Keep in mind that as plants get bigger, they will need more water and need to be watered more frequently.

A flush can also be done to clear plants of nutrients if they have a nutrient imbalance, such as nutrient lockout, when your plants are overloaded with nutrients and unable to absorb new ones.

Like all plants, cannabis requires water in order to perform its basic functions. Water helps plants absorb nutrients from the soil and then moves up the plant and into the leaves, and without it, the plant can’t survive. But giving a marijuana plant the proper amount of water may be more difficult than you think.

Water your marijuana plants as normal when in the flushing phase—don’t let them get too dry or too wet. Make sure not to harvest dry or wilting weed plants—they should be nice and healthy when you cut them down.

The word “hydroponics” is derived from Latin that literally translates to “water working”.

Hydroponics reduces the risk of plant disease and pest infestations , as a result of which you don’t need to use a lot of pesticides. This leads to the creation of a product that is much safer for medical marijuana patients.

It’s only the availability of light that limits the plant’s density in a hydroponic growth room. Quicker maturity also leads to an overall higher yield. If ideal conditions are maintained, growers can even choose to harvest about four to five times a year.

Growing Weed Using Hydroponics.

As you can tell, growing hydroponically can get complicated and expensive. That’s why we recommend growing with natural soil, especially for beginners.

The plants take in their required nutrition both from the water and the air, therefore, it’s necessary to maintain a perfect atmosphere in your hydroponic system.

It lets you supervise the factors that affect the growth and quality of the plant along with its yield. This can lead to the production of higher quality weed than plants grown normally. However, all that supervision and care creates more work and cost for the grower, and allows for more things to go wrong during the grow.

The hydroponic method allows you to produce higher yields of weed from a particular plot size, which is a huge advantage when compared to soil-based cultivation when growing commercially. However, this yield increase is negligible when growing smaller, personal amounts of cannabis.

As hydroponics allows you to grow weed indoors, you can have much more control over the environment than you would have outdoors.

In a hydroponic system, the plants don’t need to expend energy growing big root webs to absorb the nutrients. This is because they are set up so that they are able to consume all the nutrients directly.

Produce more weed than normal.

If you have limited space, hydroponics can be a good option for you. Since hydroponic weed can be grown in your bedroom or inside a closet, space is less of an issue. Though with autoflowering cannabis and a quality soil grow kit , high quality weed can be grown naturally in very little space, and at less cost.

Cannabis, or weed, has the ability to grow almost anywhere, be it under different climates or varying conditions. In fact, growing weed at home has a lot of pretty straightforward approaches, and one of the ways to do it is by using hydroponics.

Of the reasons why hydroponic weed is sometimes preferred, one of the top-most is that it allows you to have weed of the highest quality, without having to wait for the most ideal environmental conditions for growing it outdoors.

Want to grow pot indoors? Check out these grow pots for weed!

Hydroponics reduces the risk of diseases.

This high quality is achieved because the hydroponic system makes complete use of water, nutrients, and the growing space efficiently.

There is one reason in particular why some consider growing weed hydroponically better than soil-grown weed. That reason is yield. Hydroponics, when done correctly, can yield about 20% more than soil grown weed. That’s why it’s the preferred option for commercially grown medical marijuana. Here are the several benefits of growing weed hydroponically:

If you’re looking to grow your own cannabis plant, consider a Pot for Pot’s all natural complete soil growing kits .

Because of this, hydroponic marijuana can benefit patients with cancer and AIDS because a regular intake of chemically contaminated marijuana can cause several unwanted side-effects. Of course, you can also avoid harmful pesticides and other nasty stuff by growing weed at home , whether hydroponically or in soil.

Although initially it was meant for just vegetables and garden plants, it was soon realized that this is a smart method of growing weed / marijuana.

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This article was co-authored by Lauren Kurtz. Lauren Kurtz is a Naturalist and Horticultural Specialist. Lauren has worked for Aurora, Colorado managing the Water-Wise Garden at Aurora Municipal Center for the Water Conservation Department. She earned a BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies from Western Michigan University in 2014.

Whether you call it weed, cannabis, pot, marijuana, or something else, the plant known as Cannabis sativa is actually easy to grow at home when you know what you need to do. Growing hydroponically will provide you with higher yields and a shorter grow time compared to growing in soil, but it can often be difficult for the beginning grower to get started with hydroponics. However, most people think of plants growing in water when they think “hydroponics” but actually your plants will get many of the benefits of hydroponics as long as they’re getting their nutrients directly in their water supply. However because of superior air to water ratio in hydroponics, it remains the industry standard. This tutorial will show you step-by-step how to grow your marijuana in 3-4 months using the (arguably) easiest hydroponic method: hand-watering in a soil-less medium.