growing marijuana indoors soil

Avoid Miracle-Gro! Do not use “Miracle-Gro” soil or any soil that has “extended-release” nutrients for growing cannabis. These types of soil will continue to release nitrogen to your plant roots for up to 6 months. This can cause deficiencies or burn your cannabis plants in the flowering/budding stage, reducing your overall yields. I have seen growers successively grow cannabis in Miracle-Gro, but many of them struggled with nutrient problems in the flowering stage.

An easy and simple nutrient system for beginning cannabis soil growers is the Fox Farms Nutrient Trio for Soil.

Add nutrients to your water (if needed), then adjust the pH. The most common reason growers get nutrient deficiencies is because they don’t adjust the pH of their water. Most soil growers only add nutrients every other watering (or even less often), but even when giving just plain water you still need to adjust the pH of your water to prevent deficiencies.

Option 1: Store-Bought Soil + Nutrients – Growers can buy soil online or at a store, and simply add nutrients throughout their grow while watering for thriving, happy cannabis plants.

Maintenance Effort – Watering your plants, providing nutrients and managing the pH to prevent deficiencies (composted super soil has microorganisms in it to help manage pH and make nutrients available to your plant roots).

This plant was grown using the House & Garden Line-up listed above.

Soil Cons for Growing Cannabis.

Slower Growth – Growing in soil is not as fast as growing in a soilless or hydroponic setup – hydroponic plants tend to get better growth rates, especially in the vegetative stage.

How to water cannabis plants in soil.

Pests – Soil is an organic material, and there are many types of bugs that can live in soil. Often, soil-growers seem to suffer more often from pests attacking their plants than hydroponic growers.

Simple – hand-water your plants in containers.

The most common mistake made by beginners growing cannabis in soil is they water their plants too often . Overwatering is almost never a case of giving your plants too much water at once. Instead, overwatering cannabis in soil is almost always caused by giving the plant water too often.

Many of us have seen Miracle-Gro used around our homes, so we know that it works for ‘regular houseplants’. Cannabis is just a tough weed, so Miracle-Gro nutrients should work great for it, too… right?

How long can grower be away? It’s important for a grower to always remain close by for their first grow, especially for inexperienced growers. Experienced growers can safely spend more time away from the garden.

Note: Some growers believe growing in organic composted super soil with a rich microbial life can actually improve the taste and smell of cannabis by causing a plant to produce higher levels of terpenes and terpenoids.

Don’t Use Miracle-Gro or Other “Slow Release” Soils!

No. Not really. Well kinda.

Most Common Soil Mistake: Overwatering.

In addition, we list our favorite potting soil products for cannabis, so you can grow big and bountiful yields time after time.

Make sure your plants get a loose and light soil texture to help with root growth and ensure oxygen gets to your roots.

Big Rootz’s All-Purpose Potting Soil features a professional-grade composition at a budget-friendly price. This cheap soil for growing weed is meant for indoors or outdoor gardens and has been Certified Green Clean (CGC).

Choosing the Best Soil for Indoor Cannabis Gardens.

Choosing the right type of soil can help your cannabis crop grow to new heights and produce a bountiful yield. Growing weed indoors has never been more affordable or accessible for growers of all skill levels.

The best soil for growing weed indoors includes an optimum mixture of silt, sand, and clay soil, known as loamy soil. Ideally, the mix should have about 40% silt, 20% sand, and 40% clay.

If you have an indoor cannabis grow set-up, you need the best soil for growing weed indoors . Our cannabis soil guide dives deep into the factors to consider when shopping for soil for pot plants including its drainage, water retention, and texture.

A team of weed growers developed this high-quality formula that combines rapid-release amendments with medium and slow release for an optimal performance.

PH refers to how alkaline or acidic solution is. Cannabis thrives in a soil pH range between 5.5 and 6.5. Deviating slightly from this range won’t cause too much damage but if it goes well beyond the range, you can get stunted growth, lower yields, and dead plants.

Water retention refers to your soils ability to hold water. The best soil for growing pot indoors has balanced drainage and water retention properties.

Water Retention.

While you want soil with proper drainage, you also don’t want the water to completely flush through without allowing the roots to take in water and nutrients.

As an alternative to traditional potting soil, coconut coir can provide improved aeration and drainage for your heavy feeding plants so that you don’t have to worry about overwatering.

Other goodies include bat guano, aged forest products, and earthworm castings. Keep in mind, this soil is designed for container planting.

Its sandy loam, aged forest products, and sphagnum peat moss give this soil a properly aerated texture that is sure to improve nutrient uptake. This soil is also designed for container use.

5. Big Rootz All-Purpose Potting Soil.

FoxFarm’s Happy Frog Potting Soil is ready-to-use for indoor and outdoor applications. Happy Frog potting soil features soil microbes such as mycorrhizae and humic acid to improve root growth and nutrient uptake.

FoxFarm’s Ocean Forest Potting Soil features a robust blend of ingredients from the “earth and sea.” Its powerful ingredients include fish emulsion, aged forest products, earthworm castings, crab meal, and sphagnum peat moss.

Full of helpful microorganisms and fungi, this concentrate can produce the best-looking and tasting buds around. Ingredients include organic earthworm castings, bat guano, blood meal, bone meal, azomite, epsom salt, coconut water powder, kelp meal, alfalfa meal, and so much more.

Cannabis potting soil requires proper soil drainage. When watered, the soil should not hold the water too much to where it pools on the top. If you have bad drainage, your plants can be vulnerable to root rot and mold.

When shopping for the best potting soil for cannabis, there are few factors to consider. First, how many plants are you intending to grow? This will help determine the amount of soil you will need.

Odor becomes much more difficult to manage in the final six weeks of a marijuana plant’s life, when trichomes and terpene production ramps up. You can also get odor-absorbing gels, which replace weed smells with other scents. Keep in mind that odor gels don’t eliminate odors, but simply mask them.

Drainage is key, as cannabis plants can get waterlogged and develop root rot . If you repurpose containers, be sure they have holes in the bottoms and set them in trays.

You’ll also want to take this time to check over your weed plants for pests, mold, or nutrient deficiencies.

Getting the right climate for your plants can be a delicate balance involving multiple pieces of equipment and also lots of electricity. This is part of what makes growing weed indoors more expensive than growing outdoors.

You can make this yourself by combining worm castings, bat guano, and other components with a good soil and letting it sit for a few weeks, or it can be purchased pre-made from a local nursery or grow shop.

Make sure air is circulating through your garden.

It’s a good idea to start small—the smaller the grow, the less expensive it is to set up. Newbie mistakes will be less costly if you only have a handful of plants. Additionally, most state laws only allow for growing six plants, but some allow up to 12.

You can let your plants get as big as you want, and can control when they flower and when you harvest, and you can start another batch right away or whenever you want. You can grow any time of year, even straight through winter or summer, and you’ll get consistent crops each time.

So when growing weed indoors, you can control the size of your plants by flipping them into flower whenever you think they’re big enough in the vegetative stage.

Unlike outdoor growing, you aren’t tied to the sun and the seasons. You will be providing the entire environment the plants need to grow, including the grow medium—soil, rockwool, etc.—and regulating the amount of water and nutrients they receive, as well as controlling temperature, humidity, and more for them.

You will definitely want to invest in a timer for your lights. Because the amount of light a plant receives dictates its vegetative or flowering stage, it’s important to give it a consistent amount of light every day, and that’s done with a timer. It’s a good idea to check your timer at least once a week to make sure it’s working properly.

Fans are a must in a grow space to move air around, so buy some of those before an AC unit. If you find that fans aren’t bringing down the temperature enough, then you may want to invest in an AC.

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments or liquid nutrients. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.

Think of all the equipment in your grow space as organs in the body—if one fails, the others will have to work a lot harder for a bit, and then will fail in a matter of time.

One trick to avoid hot temps is to have the grow lights on during the evening, when it’s cooler outside, and leave the lights off during the day when it’s hot. This may help bring down the temps, but you’ll only be able to work on the plants at nighttime when the lights are on.

What to look for in a pot.

The two factors you need to control to dial in the environment are temperature and humidity.

Plants in the vegetative stage maintain a low odor as they haven’t begun to produce terpenes, the plant’s aromatic compounds. As weed plants transition into the flowering phase, trichomes will start to develop and produce terpenes, causing them to smell more.

When starting with clones or seedlings, you’ll want to check your plants every day because they’re delicate and sensitive to environmental conditions. You may need to adjust temperature and humidity levels in your indoor grow space at first to hit the sweet spot for your plants.

When designing your space, you’ll need to take into account room for your plants, as well as space for lights, fans, ducting, and other equipment. You’ll also need space to work on the plants. Cannabis plants can double in size in the early stages of flowering, so make sure you have adequate head space!

As your indoor weed plants grow, they’ll need less attention, but you’ll still need to check up on them every 2-3 days.

But the benefits are great: LEDs last much longer, use far less electricity, create less heat, and the best designs generate a fuller spectrum of light, which can get bigger yields and better quality.

Watering and nutrients.

As your plants get bigger and especially when they start flowering, they’ll start to smell more. Outfitting your grow with a dehuey or AC can help bring odor down.

There should be a comfortable airflow both above and below the canopy, and fans shouldn’t blow air directly onto plants—this can cause wind burn, which makes leaves recede into a claw-like deformation.

These come in different shapes and sizes and are a great way to get rid of odor in an indoor weed grow. Also known as “carbon scrubbers” for their ability to get contaminants out of the air, these employ activated and highly ionized carbon to attract particulates responsible for carrying odor, such as dust, hair, mold spores, and volatile organic compounds, and traps them in a filter.

If you can’t afford both MH and HPS bulbs, start with HPS as they deliver more light per watt. Magnetic ballasts are cheaper than digital ballasts, but run hotter, are less efficient, and harder on your bulbs. Digital ballasts are generally a better option, but are more expensive. Beware of cheap digital ballasts, as they are often not well shielded and can create electromagnetic interference that will affect radio and WiFi signals.

The biggest variability in how long a marijuana plant takes to grow will happen in the vegetative stage—after the seedling phase and before flower.

Your cannabis wants a safe, healthy place for root development. Without healthy roots, your cannabis will never thrive. Roots are in charge of water retention, nutrient absorption, anchoring the plant, and they also facilitate vegetative growth.

You’ll need a dedicated space for your marijuana plants—you won’t be able to move them around. Ideally, the space is next to a window so you can vent air from the grow space outside. Growing weed plants smell! Especially when flowering kicks in, you’ll want to redirect air so your house doesn’t reek of weed.