growing marijuana indoors smell

You’ll likely yield about the same amount of weed in both cases, but more harvests mean you’ll have fresh weed to smoke more often and have more opportunities to grow different strains. But more harvests also means more work in cleaning up the space between harvests, trimming, etc.

Most dehumidifiers and ACs have built-in thermostats, but if they don’t, you’ll want to buy an external one.

Many growers will start plants in a one-gallon pot and then transplant up to a bigger pot as plants get bigger. A lot of growers will transplant once, from a one-gallon to a five-gallon pot, and harvest from there. If your plants get bigger, they may need a seven- or ten-gallon pot.

Carbon filters usually work best when positioned at the highest point in your grow space, where the most heat accumulates.

Inexpensive options include standard plastic pots or cloth bags, while some growers choose to spend more on “smart pots” or “air pots”—containers designed to enhance airflow to the plant’s root zone.

Indoor marijuana grow timeline.

Standard plastic containers are a popular option for growers operating on a budget. These pots are inexpensive and provide the essentials for your plants.

It can be tricky getting the right balance of temperature and humidity because they affect each other—turning up your dehumidifier will lower the humidity of your grow space, but it will also increase the temperature of the area. This in turn may require you to turn on an AC unit—everything’s connected!

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments or liquid nutrients. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.

Although you’ll be controlling the climate inside the grow space, climate outside the grow space will affect your plants. If the environment outside your grow space is very warm or humid, you’ll have issues controlling your grow space. Choose a cool, dry area with ready access to fresh air from outside.

Generally speaking, it takes anywhere from 10-32 weeks, or about 3-8 months, to smoke what you’ve grown. (It’ll be quicker if you start with a clone or an autoflower seed.)

When starting with clones or seedlings, you’ll want to check your plants every day because they’re delicate and sensitive to environmental conditions. You may need to adjust temperature and humidity levels in your indoor grow space at first to hit the sweet spot for your plants.

The flowering stage will always take about eight weeks—some strains take seven, some nine, some even more, it depends on the strain.

Fans are a must in a grow space to move air around, so buy some of those before an AC unit. If you find that fans aren’t bringing down the temperature enough, then you may want to invest in an AC.

There should be a comfortable airflow both above and below the canopy, and fans shouldn’t blow air directly onto plants—this can cause wind burn, which makes leaves recede into a claw-like deformation.

Getting the right climate for your plants can be a delicate balance involving multiple pieces of equipment and also lots of electricity. This is part of what makes growing weed indoors more expensive than growing outdoors.

Regulating temperature and humidity in your indoor grow space.

The main drawback is fluorescent lights are less efficient, generating about 20-30% less light per watt of electricity used; space is another concern, as it would require approximately 19 four-foot long T5 bulbs to equal the output of a single 600 watt HPS bulb.

When designing your space, you’ll need to take into account room for your plants, as well as space for lights, fans, ducting, and other equipment. You’ll also need space to work on the plants. Cannabis plants can double in size in the early stages of flowering, so make sure you have adequate head space!

One trick to avoid hot temps is to have the grow lights on during the evening, when it’s cooler outside, and leave the lights off during the day when it’s hot. This may help bring down the temps, but you’ll only be able to work on the plants at nighttime when the lights are on.

Unless you’re growing in a large, open space with a lot of ventilation, you’ll need air-cooled reflector hoods to mount your lamps in, as HID bulbs produce a lot of heat. This requires ducting and exhaust fans, which will increase your initial cost but make controlling temperature in your grow room much easier.

The biggest variability in how long a marijuana plant takes to grow will happen in the vegetative stage—after the seedling phase and before flower.

What type of container you use will depend on the grow medium, the system, and the size of your plants.

You can connect a controller to fans, dehumidifiers, humidifiers, heaters, or air conditioners, and set thresholds whereby each device will power on and off based on your ideal environmental settings. Some units run autonomously, making changes based on set parameters, while others allow you to control each element via an app on a phone, tablet, or computer.

What to look for in a pot.

Odor becomes much more difficult to manage in the final six weeks of a marijuana plant’s life, when trichomes and terpene production ramps up. You can also get odor-absorbing gels, which replace weed smells with other scents. Keep in mind that odor gels don’t eliminate odors, but simply mask them.

Make sure all equipment is on, no breakers have flipped, and everything is running smoothly. Check lights, timers, fans, dehueys, ACs, and anything else that plugs into the wall or has a battery.

Proper air circulation will help maintain temperature and humidity, and also bring down odor. Ideally, air needs to move through a garden every few minutes, and you should create a vent to the outside. Oscillating fans, and intake and exhaust fans can move air through your garden quickly, taking odors out with them.

When growing weed indoors, you’ll likely have to add nutrients to your plants. You won’t need to add nutrients every time you water, but get on a schedule where you water every other time, or two on, one off.

This is easily achieved by placing an exhaust fan near the top of the space to suck out warm air—warm air rises—and adding a port or passive fan on the opposite side of the space near the floor to bring in cool air. A complete air exchange throughout the entire grow space should occur once every minute or so.

Because the amount of light a plant receives is so important, you’ll need to make your indoor grow space light-tight. Light leaks during dark periods will confuse your plants and can cause them to produce male flowers or revert to a different stage.

If you can’t afford both MH and HPS bulbs, start with HPS as they deliver more light per watt. Magnetic ballasts are cheaper than digital ballasts, but run hotter, are less efficient, and harder on your bulbs. Digital ballasts are generally a better option, but are more expensive. Beware of cheap digital ballasts, as they are often not well shielded and can create electromagnetic interference that will affect radio and WiFi signals.

Fans should be positioned to provide direct, even airflow throughout the garden. This typically involves using multiple fans that work together or fans that have oscillation capabilities.

There really aren’t a lot of options when it comes to stopping smells in the grow room. Either you find a way to “scrub” the smells out of the air, or you find a way to cover up the smell.

Also, using these products on your cannabis plants can reduce or alter their natural smell.

Make sure the “CFM” rating of the carbon filter is the same or slightly higher than the one listed on your fan. This ensures maximum efficiency but also has an added security benefit: it makes sure your carbon filter is only taking in as much air as it can effective scrub for odors.

How to Find & Install The Right Carbon Filter.

Recommended Marijuana Odor Neutralizer – Ona Products.

Ona products are quick and easy to use. They are effective at covering up smells in a small grow room, though they will only work for a relatively short window of time and must be replaced every few weeks up to a few months.

Ona Gel Pro (stock up on these to make sure no one can smell cannabis in your home)

Smell Emergency?

Carbon filters are what you need if it’s important to neutralize the air coming out of your exhaust. A good carbon filter will make sure you never accidentally leak the smell of cannabis out through a window into your neighborhood.

Make Sure Only YOU Get To Enjoy Your Plant’s Smell!

Many standard air-cooled marijuana grow lights are fitted with a 6″ exhaust hole (listed as 6″ air-cooled hoods). For most small-scale growers using a tent, you will want to get everything in 6″: including fan, carbon filter, and ducting.

Any odor neutralizer or fragrance needs to be constant since your plants don’t stop making their unique flowering scent once they start. Once the smell arrives in your grow room, it basically keeps getting stronger until harvest.

For a small grow with just 1 or 2 plants, you can usually get away with covering up the smell.

How long do they last? It depends on the size Ona Product you buy, as well as the temperature/humidity of your grow area.

Most household products like wall plug-ins and sprays just aren’t strong enough to cover up the smell of a marijuana grow room for long, if at all.

These are hands-down the best option for controlling marijuana grow room odors. Carbon filters (also called ‘carbon scrubbers’) will actually pull the smells out of the air, neutralizing any odors that pass through.

Never place Ona products in with your flowering plants!

These devices use activated carbon to chemically absorb smells and other impurities from any air that is pushed through the filter.

Refer to the diagram below to see how a carbon filter should be set up in your exhaust system. The carbon scrubber being placed at the back of the exhaust system minimizes the risk of flowering cannabis smell escaping.

These should be reserved for emergency situations and it is recommended to use sparingly, as the scent lasts only for a couple of hours and when used excessively, the plants will absorb the scent.

These solutions, while keeping the odor levels low, also focus on maintaining optimum growth conditions for the plants which are an obvious benefit in the long-term.

Harvest up to a pound.

Both standing and oscillating fans provide varying levels of air circulation that not only keeps the air clean but also removes the odor when paired with an air duct and an exhaust fan.

At A Pot for Pot , we’re dedicated to making cannabis growing straightforward and easy-to-maintain. With that in mind, here’s our guide to smell-proofing your grow room.

Use Odor Absorbing Gels.

When it comes to controlling the odor, there is only so much that can be done when it comes to making the environment around it better.

By getting rid of such unwanted particles, the odor in the room is naturally reduced to a more tolerable and ideal level.

A Pot for Pot cannabis grow lights are a great addition to your indoor cannabis grow room.

Now that you know how to keep your indoor marijuana grow room smell-proof, check out other products at A Pot for Pot to make the growing process even better.

While the smell is tolerable and fleeting on small grows and with single plants, it does tend to get inconvenient for long-term, large scale grow-ops.

It’s safe to say that an indoor cannabis grow room isn’t the most inconspicuous thing in the world.

Whether it is a large personal cannabis grow room or a commercial one, odor control is something that shouldn’t be ignored – especially early on, since it will only get worse.

An alternative is to mask the odor. There are various odor neutralizing gels and masking solutions available that hide the cannabis scent and replace it with something else.

Any of these factors left unchecked could result in the plants letting off more odor than usual and more often than not it is an indicator of poor growth conditions within the grow room.

Due to their effectiveness in purifying the air and getting rid of various contaminants such as mold, bacteria, odors, and pests, they tend to be on the more expensive side of options when it comes to odor management.

Conclusion.

Seed Coupon Included.

Grow with the Sun.

Walls have ears and noses too. When it comes to keeping things discrete, odor management is the biggest challenge.

Are there effective ways to control cannabis odor? There are various ways to control weed odor. These include: ensuring proper air circulation, installing an activated carbon filter, use ozone generators, fitting surface and air purifiers, using odor absorbing gels and keeping room temperature in check.

Shop our easy to use growing kits at A Pot for Pot here .

It’s not a huge surprise to anyone that cannabis smells. It has a very distinct, pungent, and lingering smell that is widely recognized.

Using any of the above-listed solutions, either by themselves or combined, does not cost a lot when considering the benefit they provide to the whole process of indoor cannabis growing and the peace of mind that comes when the room is scent-proofed.

Install A Carbon Filter.

Grow Year Round.

As a plant grows and enters different stages, its need for humidity fluctuates. For example, a plant in the vegetative state requires 70% to 80% humidity, while a plant in its flowering phase requires no more than 40% to 50%.

Odor control helps keep the smell low and prying eyes away from the grow room.

When it comes to controlling odor , there are many ways to approach the situation. Most of these solutions are related to controlling the environment and how to reduce the odor while making sure the plants grow in a healthy manner.

They are recommended to be used in a commercial environment as they can be programmed based on the space of the grow room.

For those living in matchbox homes or houses with close proximity, maintaining an indoor grow farm becomes a challenge. For this, odor control is a crucial aspect.

Another effective solution for commercial indoor grow spaces is fitting surface and air purifiers. Due to their size and capacity, these are best suited for large cannabis grow rooms.

Not only is the smell widely recognized, but it is also often seen as taboo by many. Even when it is being grown in a state that has legalized it, there are still many negative connotations associated with growing cannabis.