growing marijuana clones

When getting ready to transplant, be sure to keep the environment sterile. Transplant shock can occur, so be sure to use gloves when handling clones.

Another method is to use an auto-cloner. There is an initial cost for buying an auto-cloner, but if you plan on cloning a lot, they are worth it. Auto-cloners cut down on the amount of labor needed to care for clones. Using aeroponics , these machines spray the bottoms of your cuttings with nutrient water at set intervals to promote root growth.

A clone’s stem width is a great way to get a sense of its overall health and vigor. Thin and narrow stems typically mean the clone was taken from a weak or less viable branch. These cuttings may be more prone to disease or death and their root systems may take longer to develop.

There is some speculation that clones can degrade over time based on environment stressors and other factors, but that is open to debate.

A clone is a cutting, such as a branch, that is cut off of a living marijuana plant, which will then grow into a plant itself. A clone has the same genetic makeup as the plant it was taken from, which is called the mother plant.

What to look for when buying a marijuana clone.

Be sure to work in a sterile environment. Use gloves and disinfect razors and scissors.

Powdery mildew (PM) is a very common disease found on clones, and mold spores can transfer to other plants. Keep an eye out for white powder on stems and leaves.

Be sure to inspect all areas of your clone for the presence of pests. Large pests such as fungus gnats and spider mites can be spotted relatively easily.

First, transplant your new weed clones into a more permanent container and medium. Often the grow medium used to house fresh cuttings at the shop will be different than what you use. Also, pests may be present in its medium when you bought it—transplanting your clone to a cleaner space will help mitigate any potential root damage.

Growers usually look for these qualities in a mother plant:

Not all pests, diseases, pesticide residues, or genetic markers will be easy to spot with the naked eye, but give your clones a good look before introducing them to your garden. If they look sickly or weak, they likely won’t grow well.

It’s important to know the origin of your clones because that’s where problems originate—diseases, pests, incorrectly labeled genetics, and unknown pesticide residues can come with a mystery clone.

Many diseases can be difficult to detect in cuttings, but there are a few visual cues that can be seen early on. A lack of vigor is a major cue—check for limping leaves, irregular or mutated growth, and discoloration.

If you live in a medical or adult-use state, you’ll be able to get clones from some local weed shops, but make sure it’s a reputable shop.

Choose a rooting medium and setup.

If they look good after a week or so, go ahead and introduce them to the rest of your garden.

One of the best things about clones is they are exact genetic replicas of the mother plant from which they were taken. If you have a particular marijuana plant you like, whether for its appearance, smell, effects, or something else, you can take clones of it and grow it again, ad infinitum.

For more info on cloning setups, check out our Guide to cannabis cloning equipment.

Clones will also save space in your garden—with seeds, you have to grow many and sex them out to identify and get rid of the males. Also, usually some seeds don’t germinate. You’ll need extra space for all those seeds, and they might not even turn into full plants.

Some growers have dedicated mother plants only for taking cuttings, but this setup takes up a lot of space and materials—you’ll need to keep the mother plant alive, but you won’t get any buds off it because it’ll always stay in the vegetative stage. Some growers find it hard to justify devoting time, energy, and space to plants that won’t produce buds. If your grow space is tight, this might not be the best setup.

After roots develop, it is then transplanted into a pot or the ground, and it will grow like any weed plant.

Stem width.

A typical clone is about 6 inches in length, give or take, and after cutting it off the mother plant, the clone is put into a medium such as a root cube and given a hormone to encourage root growth.

Don’t fertilize mother plants for a few days leading up to taking cuttings. This will allow nitrogen to work its way out of the leaves. When you take cuttings, an excess of nitrogen in the leaves and stems will trick your clones into attempting to grow vegetation instead of diverting energy to rooting.

After your clones have been properly cleaned and transplanted into their new medium, make sure to keep them quarantined for a few days to a week. Doing this will protect the rest of your garden if they do develop problems, and you’ll be able to pull them out easily.

Mother plants always stay in the vegetative stage as clones are clipped off. It’s important to not take cuttings off a flowering weed plant—this can cause the clone to turn into a hermaphrodite and may also damage the flowering plant.

Cannabis mother plants guarantee genetic consistency, so each new generation of clones taken will have the same taste, flavor, effects, and other characteristics. Clones will also generally grow at the same rate as the mother, produce a similar quality product, and grow with the same vigor, allowing you to dial in your process and really get to know how to grow that particular weed plant.

To take a cutting:

As genetics are identical between a mother and a clone, it’s important to choose a good plant as a mother. A wilty plant, or one that doesn’t produce good buds, won’t make a good mother.

Cut 5-8 inches (10-20 cm) below cannabis growth tip.

Make sure you coat the entire bottom of the cutting, so that all the parts of the clone that get put into your starter cube is covered in gel.

If possible, give a potential mother less nitrogen then usual when feeding for a week or two before cloning as this will promote better rooting in her clones. Regular flowering nutrients work well.

Immediately put your new marijuana cutting in a glass of water! This will help prevent bubbles from getting in the stem!

Place the new clone into a moistened starter cube, and press around the bottom to make sure everything is sealed and no air can get to the rooting area.

6.) Prepare the mother plant for cloning if you can.

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For the first 10 days and especially for the first 3-4 days, you don’t want to use full-strength light on your new clones.

Now it is generally recommended to take clones during the vegetative stage of marijuana because clones taken during the flowering stage can have a much harder time taking root. However, if you take clones from the bottom of a cannabis plant in the flowering stage, you can usually get it to clone by pinching off any buds and following the normal steps. This can be a great way to save a plant that is performing really well in the flowering stage!

All clones are genetically identical to the plant you took them from. So if you have an incredible specimen of a plant, you can make more plants that will have all very similar characteristics as the mother cannabis plant. You can take dozens of clones from a single plant. In fact anywhere there’s a “growth tip” will yield a clone!

And remember to be patient if it’s your first time. Almost every cutting will take root if you just wait long enough, and keep providing the right conditions. Some plants will root in just a few days, 7 days is average, but some clones can take 2 weeks (or even more) to start showing roots!

1.) Keep the leaves of each new clone gently moist – clones love misty conditions (especially the first week after taking a cutting)

How To Take a Cannabis Clone.

Basically, you just want to cut away a small part of the plant. The roots will grow out of the “cut” you made, and the rest of the cutting will start growing into an individual plant.

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Store your rooting powder or gel in a cool, dark, dry place and never use “contaminated” rooting powder or gel.

A little warmer than room temperature 72-77 °F (22-25 °C ) is perfect. Many automatic cloners come with a heat setting.

Yet if you follow the steps in this article, it’s not a matter of if your clones will take root, but just a matter of when. Almost 100% of clones will take root if you follow these instructions and just giver her enough time.

To promote root growth, try to give new clones a minimum level of nitrogen and possibly increased levels of phosphorus. Basically, any sort of flowering nutrients would be well suited to give to new clones. However, make sure if you’re feeding them nutes to give them only 1/4 to 1/2 the recommended amounts for seedlings!

In the next section I’ll explain exactly what your new clones need to thrive.

When you recreate the right conditions, you don’t need a cloner or humidity dome, yet these types of devices make successful cloning and root growth happen practically by itself.

This article was co-authored by Maggie Moran. Maggie Moran is a Professional Gardener in Pennsylvania.

There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

If you live in a place where it is legal to grow marijuana, you can expand your crop by planting clones. Planting clones of marijuana plants is a simple process that only requires a few steps. Choose clean pots with new soil and provide a warm, moist environment with weak light to ensure that the clones thrive.

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All you’ll need to plant clones is a pot with large drainage holes, soil, and a warm place for them to grow. Your pot needs to have good drainage because clones don’t do well if the soil gets waterlogged. Choose a soil high in nitrogen, which helps clones thrive. Give your clones about 18 hours of weak light, like compact fluorescent light, each day for best results. Clones do best in environments between 70 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit, so make sure you place them in a hot room if necessary. You should also water your clones every day to keep the soil moist, but not too damp. For tips from our Gardening co-author on how to transplant cloves, read on!

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