galactic gas seeds

The Galactic Gas strain is a rare one to find and usually sparks interest in connoisseurs. It grows small round colorful buds, with vivid greens, purples, and yellows winding their way through each other along with pastel orange pistils.

What color does Galactic Gas have?

What does Galactic Gas mean?

Genetic Lineage.

Where does Galactic Gas come from?

What does Galactic Gas taste like?

Galactic Gas is a rare hybrid strain that produces colorful buds, with vivid greens, purples, yellows and oranges spiraling from its calyxes. Those that enjoy this strain reported feeling blissful in both mind and body while some experienced enhanced creativity.

Currently the parent strains of Galactic Gas remain unknown.

The scent of this strain can be quite strong, having a skunky, fuel-like aroma with a hint of pine.

It grows small round colorful buds, with vivid greens, purples, and yellows winding their way through each other along with pastel orange pistils.

Frequently Asked Questions About Galactic Gas.

What does Galactic Gas smell like?

What effects does Galactic Gas have?

This strain’s name most likely stems from not only its colorful appearance, having the many colors of a spiraling galaxy full of stars, but from its potent scent that often lingers after containing it.

Galactic Gas THC levels average around 20%. Reviewers have reported having an out-of-this-world experience as their mood improved and their body fell into a state of bliss. Some said they experienced enhanced creativity as negative thoughts left their mind, while others liked the sensation of relaxation making their limbs heavy.

The taste of this strain is similar to its scent, being skunky and fuel-like, though a bit of pine becomes more apparent on the exhale.

Galactic Gas’s aroma can be quite potent and tends to linger in a room for a while. It’s skunky and like jet fuel, with a bit of pine on the exhale when smoking or vaping.

The origins of Galactic Gas currently remain a mystery.

Reviewers report having an out-of-this-world experience as their mood improved and their body fell into a state of bliss. Some said they experienced enhanced creativity as negative thoughts left their minds, while others liked the sensation of relaxation which made their limbs feel heavy.

Galaxy is a 70% Indica hybrid marijuana strain that is a cross of Afghani and Northern Lights. It is a short-flowering, highly-productive plant that will need to be supported during flowering to prevent branches from snapping under the weight of its buds.

Galaxy will reach between 60 – 130 cm. when grown indoors with yields being very good at 500 – 600 gr/m2 in 50 – 55 days of florescence under 600-watt lighting. Cultivated outdoors , this plant will grow a little taller but becomes rather bushier with a truly fantastic yield potential of 400 – 2000 gr/plant, with northern latitude harvests during September. Due to the density and size of its buds, greenhouse cultivation is not recommended unless air circulation is very good otherwise fungus may take hold if humidity levels are high.

Galaxy has an undeniably minty taste which is even more delicious than the chocolate bar of the same name. THC production is very high at 21.7%, with CBD at 1.1%. Its effect is powerful, long-lasting, and ultimately very relaxing.

How Galaxy Grows.

Galaxy Taste, Smell, and Effect.

Tracking the evolution of high redshift seed black hole masses to late times, we examine the observable signatures today. These massive initial black hole seeds form at extremely high redshifts from the direct collapse of pre-galactic gas discs. Populating dark matter halos with seeds formed in this fashion, we follow the mass assembly history of these black holes to the present time using a Monte-Carlo merger tree approach. Utilizing this formalism, we predict the black hole mass function at high redshifts and at the present time; the integrated mass density of black holes in the Universe; the luminosity function of accreting black holes as a function of redshift and the scatter in observed, local M bh -σ relation. Comparing the predictions of the ‘light’ seed model with these massive seeds we find that significant differences appear predominantly at the low mass end of the present day black hole mass function. However, all our models predict that low surface brightness, bulge-less galaxies with large discs are least likely to be sites for the formation of massive seed black holes at high redshifts. The efficiency of seed formation at high redshifts has a direct influence on the black hole occupation fraction in galaxies at z=0. This effect is more pronounced for low mass galaxies. This is the key discriminant between the models studied here and the Population III remnant `light’ seed model. We find that there exists a population of low mass galaxies that do not host nuclear black holes. Our prediction of the shape of the M bh – σ relation at the low mass end and increased scatter has recently been corroborated by observations.