can you grow weed in nc

“You want those people who need it to have a diagnosis that is very objective,” Taylor said. “When you get into pain, anxiety, depression, these things become a little bit more subjective. So now, are people taking it for abuse or are they taking it for need? I think that’s where politicians get a little concerned.”

“Their position is that it is a traditional medicine, and that’s why they support it and they’re firm believers in it and they want us to legalize it,” Sneed said. ”That was one of the drivers behind the decriminalization as well.”

Sneed said he is hoping that the Cherokee might eventually see some of the economic benefits that states which have legalized marijuana have seen.

The bill would allow a narrowly crafted group of people diagnosed by a doctor with a “debilitating medical condition” including cancer, epilepsy, positive HIV or AIDS status, or post traumatic stress disorder to have access to a medical marijuana card.

As the state continues to battle with the opioid epidemic, some advocates argue that medical marijuana could be used to curb addictions.

“There may be times when I think a higher THC content (would be more helpful),” Taylor said. “For me, it’s not one size fits all. It’s all variables of gray and I need that freedom to kind of pick between the two.”

Of those polled, 64% of voters said legalizing marijuana would help the economy.

“Where do patients go typically to get medicine? They go to their pharmacist, or their doctor gives them medicines or shots or vaccinations at their office” Taylor said. “For me, those distribution sites are important. It’s important that we hold on to them, and we keep them in the practice of medicine rather than just retail locations with bud tenders.”

“I can tell you from experience,” Armentano said, “In virtually every state that has either medical access or adult-use access, every consecutive year, lawmakers go back and they tweak and they revise and they amend those laws in the cases of medical marijuana … They make them less restrictive, not more restrictive.”

Broadening the criteria of the bill could give physicians like Taylor more flexibility to make a judgment call for what cannabinoid would help a patient’s medical problems.

North Carolina Senate Bill 711, the NC Compassionate Care Act , could be landmark legislation for the state, which has long shirked legalizing medical marijuana.

“It’s an important first step,” Nickel said. “Is it going to go as far as other states? No, but it’s a start. There are a lot of people that will be helped by this bill, when an effort passes, but it’s still an uphill battle.”

The bill is set to face its next hurdle before becoming law in a Senate Committee on Finance meeting Tuesday, July 20, one of several committees it needs to pass before going to the Senate floor.

Sneed doesn’t foresee his efforts to legalize medical marijuana failing due to considerable grassroots support within the tribe, but “as far as the economic opportunity, that window is shrinking pretty quickly.”

Harrington said she probably wouldn’t have supported the bill six months ago, at the Judiciary Committee hearing.

Medical marijuana is legal in 36 states and Washington, D.C., and recreational marijuana is legal in 18, according to Insider, putting North Carolina in the minority of states where weed is not legal in any capacity, even as its northern neighbor, Virginia made plans to legalize up to an ounce of recreational marijuana in three years .

“If they stick with the bill the way it’s been, it’ll fail economically,” Parekh said. “It wouldn’t sustain having that many limited conditions. There’s not enough of a market for everyone investing that much in their business, investing the license, investing infrastructure — the states aren’t going to make enough taxes on that to make it worth their time.

Cannabis advocates and some lawmakers generally agree that the bill isn’t perfect.

Legislators in favor of keeping the bill’s requirements narrowly tailored argue that they do not want to see recreational marijuana in the state because of potential risks to children.

Should it pass, North Carolina would be “the most conservative state of all those states with just a very, very narrowly tailored focus just on folks with chronic conditions, end of life care,” Sen. Wiley Nickel (D-Cary), said at a Judiciary Committee hearing on the bill on July 1.

He also said it’s important to consider the nature of those locations.

Accessibility of distribution sites.

“There may be times when I think a higher THC content [would be more helpful],” Taylor said. “For me, it’s not one size fits all. It’s all variables of gray and I need that freedom to kind of pick between the two.”

“Forty is not many for a large state like ours,” Taylor said.

The Cherokee have spent money, time and resources to combat the opioid epidemic. Sneed was a high school teacher on tribal lands during the height of the opioid epidemic there in the 2000s, when he can remember at least one person dying per week due to overdose.

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North Carolina Senate Bill 711, the NC Compassionate Care Act, could be landmark legislation for the state, which has long shirked legalizing medical marijuana.

No matter what happens at the state level, Sneed said, the Cherokee will proceed with their plans for legalization.

Medical marijuana is legal in 36 states and Washington, D.C., and recreational marijuana is legal in 18, according to Insider, putting North Carolina in the minority of states where weed is not legal in any capacity, even as its northern neighbor, Virginia made plans to legalize up to an ounce of recreational marijuana in three years.

Advocates push to lessen restrictions.

Harrington said she probably wouldn’t have supported the bill six months ago, at the Judiciary Committee hearing.

In order to obtain a license to grow and sell marijuana in North Carolina under the current bill, licensees must pay a nonrefundable license fee of $50,000 plus an additional $5,000 for each production facility or cannabis center they operate under that license. This is in addition to a fee of 10 percent of gross revenue from cannabis sales that suppliers must pay to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services each month.

“A lot of folks have expressed to me the dangers of marijuana to teenagers,” said Sen. Michael Lee (R-Wilmington) at the Judiciary Committee hearing. “I agree with them. Recreational marijuana is not what we want in our state.”

They are so worried and concerned about the youth that they will be continuing to put them in a situation to be buying cannabis off the black markets where dealers will also sell cocaine and heroin. So Senator Michael Lee I hope your children are not the ones who end up experimenting with cannabis in a black market and end up dying from heroin overdoses. Yah D-U-M-B-A-S-S.

“It’s really one of those things that if we were going to be a player in it, five years ago would have been the time to go to jump,” Sneed said. “But we’ll see.”

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“You want those people who need it to have a diagnosis that is very objective,” Taylor said. “When you get into pain, anxiety, depression, these things become a little bit more subjective. So now, are people taking it for abuse or are they taking it for need? I think that’s where politicians get a little concerned.”

The Eastern Band of Cherokee, which has tribal land in Western North Carolina’s Qualla Boundary, took its first step in legalizing marijuana in May when it decriminalized possession of up to one ounce of marijuana for people 21 and older on tribal lands. Sneed has just submitted an ordinance that would launch a medicinal program on tribal lands.

A poll conducted by Elon University in partnership with The Charlotte Observer, The Durham Herald-Sun and The Raleigh News & Observer found that 73 percent of North Carolina voters supported legalizing medical marijuana and a little more than half of voters supported recreational marijuana legalization.

I do smoke cannabis more than 20 years it make feel great to work my garden. I plant over thousand corn . plant, 600 Big Boy, Cherokee Purple and Purple tomatoes . I will plant Ten thousand Red and yellow Onion . and more Vegetables . !! Cannabis helps me focus and less pains also helps me everything even sleep too. My wife have worst health issues than me and she use cannabis to control and stabilize her pain !!

“My husband was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and has been going through some cancer treatments,” Harrington said. “And I believe we’ve already had some moments in our life where this type of medication would have assisted in some of the responses to the treatment.”

James Taylor, anesthesiologist and physician at Integrated Pain Solutions, an organization focused on reducing pain in patients who suffer from substance abuse disorder and other conditions, said he wants the bill to expand to his patients because they need it most.

The legislation also provides for the automatic sealing of past misdemeanor marijuana convictions and creates a petition-based process to allow people convicted of more serious charges to clear their records.

“It’s because some activists want marijuana legalized,” said Del. Chris Head, R-Botetourt. “And they want it legalized now, consequences be damned.”

Lawmakers discussed but delayed until next year a decision about allowing people currently serving jail and prison sentences related to the drug to petition a judge to be resentenced.

The final bill came close to delaying nearly all its provisions until 2024, but Gov. Ralph Northam sent the measure back to the legislature to speed the legalization timeline following an outcry by activists.

However, because those efforts will require updating state computer systems as part of a broader expungement initiative, it’s unclear when they will go into effect.

“Are we not creating a criminal act by growing one plant?” he said.

“The time has come for our state to legalize marijuana,” said House Majority Charniele Herring, D-Alexandria, who sponsored the bill, arguing the revised legislation ensures “that while we’re doing the complicated work of standing up a commercial market, we aren’t delaying immediate reforms that will make our commonwealth more equitable for all Virginians.”

“This is not going to generate some ganja fest at Jiffy Lube pavilion out in the parking lot, because that is smoking in public,” said Sen. Scott Surovell, D-Fairfax. “Because just like you can’t drink in public, you can’t smoke in public under this.”

Retail sales and social equity.

“One of the reasons I support making it come into effect soon is if we don’t, and we have to wait another three years, I’ll be in my 80s before I can do legally what I was doing illegally in my 20s,” said Sen. Janet Howell, D-Fairfax.

The product of months of negotiation and last-minute amendments, the final legislation is complex and, in some key areas, ambiguous about what will and won’t be allowed.

New laws, new penalties.

“The considerations were based on retail cannabis, and that’s why you see these gaps in the code,” they said.

With retail sales delayed until 2024, what does that mean for people transporting a legal amount of marijuana in a ziplock bag or other common container?

The Virginia General Assembly approved legislation Wednesday that will make marijuana legal on July 1.

The law allows people to cultivate up to four plants per household, provided they aren’t visible from a public street and precautions are taken to prevent unauthorized access by minors — though the bill doesn’t specify what those precautions should entail.

For now, they’ve put off decisions about what those rules might look like until next year. Outstanding questions include how licenses will be distributed and how much say local governments will have in where pot businesses locate.

The final legislation makes possession of up to an ounce of marijuana legal for people 21 and older beginning July 1. Adults caught with more than an ounce but less than a pound will face a $25 fine. And adults caught with more than a pound can be charged with a felony punishable by between one and 10 years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.

Again, retail sales won’t begin until 2024, so for the next three years, the only legal way to obtain the drug will be growing your own or getting it as a gift from someone who does.

Second, the prospect of growing up to four plants is at odds with the possession limit of one ounce. As Sen. Bill Stanley, R-Franklin, noted, one plant could easily produce several times that amount.

The legislation also prohibits manufacturing concentrate from home-grown marijuana.

Pedini said the language limiting possession to one ounce applies only to amounts held on a someone’s person or in public. “The legislative intent is to prohibit you from walking down the street with more than an ounce of it,” they said.

No Republicans voted for the bill. Some had voiced support for the measure, but said they opposed pro-union language inserted by Northam, though that amendment will not become effective unless it is approved again next year.

And while sales of the drug are illegal, the legislation permits gifting up to an ounce of the drug to any adult. (The provision explicitly prohibits transactions that have become common in Washington, D.C., where companies sell legal products at high prices that are delivered with what is described as a free gift of marijuana.)

Like the open-container rules, the home-grow provisions present some ambiguities. First, there’s no legal way to purchase seeds or cuttings, though they could be gifted under the law. Pedini said the state’s licensed medical growers faced a similar dilemma when their operations began last year, but noted they have nonetheless been able to obtain plants.

The law requires each plant be tagged with the grower’s name, driver’s license or state identification number, and a notation that it is being grown for personal use.

Democrats countered that legalization’s time had simply come.

Sealing past convictions.

They also declined to give permission to the state’s existing medical marijuana producers to begin retail sales early, worrying it would give the companies too much of a leg up when the marketplace opens.

The Democrats who carried the bills through the General Assembly have emphasized a regulatory program that will direct licenses to minority communities that faced disproportionate drug enforcement during prohibition, though again, those details will not be finalized until next year.