can you grow marijuana from seeds

To check if your cannabis is ready for trimming, perform a break test on each branch. If it bends so much it nearly breaks, then it’s ready, and if it breaks right away, it might be overly dry, but still totally usable. Trim off the buds and seal them inside a mason jar for curing, opening it periodically over the course of about four weeks to let moisture escape. Johnson outlines a detailed schedule on his website, including instructions on how to look for mold.

Cannabis cultivation laws vary widely state-by-state. Also, we can’t stress this enough: Growing cannabis is illegal in a lot of places, and the penalties — which include steep fines and prison time — can be much worse than possession, since growing can imply an intent to distribute. Black and brown folx need to be especially scrupulous about heeding these rules, since law enforcement targets us way more than white people for weed-related charges, even if we consume it at similar rates.

Your cannabis will be ready to harvest at around October. You’ll know they’re ready when the buds “start to get really, really swollen and packed pretty tight,” Johnson says. But it can be hard to tell if you’re a beginner. Many growers say that if you think your plant is ready to harvest, wait two weeks, since many newbies tend to harvest too early. Or, you could share a photo of your crop on a forum and ask more experienced growers to weigh in.

While you can absolutely grow cannabis indoors, outdoor cultivation is much simpler and cheaper, says Ron Johnson, author of How to Grow Organic Cannabis: A Step-by-Step Guide for Growing Marijuana Outdoors , who also runs the website The Cannabis Gardener. “The sun is free,” he tells Mic. “You don’t have to pay hundreds of dollars a month in electrical bills.” An outdoor garden probably won’t allow you to turn over product fast enough, but it’ll suffice if you just want to grow weed for yourself. Plus, it’s gentler on the planet.

Cannabis plants can be either male or female. Female plants yield the plump flowers, a.k.a., “buds,” that we know and love, brimming with psychoactive compounds like tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, which gets you high), Modern Farmer explains. Male plants yield much smaller flowers, which people typically don’t consume. In other words, if you want to actually indulge in your crop, you’ll want female plants.

Upkeep.

That said, when your plants are fully flowering, you might find yourself watering them daily, based on these indicators. When you do water them, keep going until you see water running off the soil, to ensure the water reaches all of the soil in the pot.

Do your homework and read up on the laws in your state. Some states prohibit growing cannabis, while others, like my home state of California, permits anyone over age 21 to grow cannabis, but only up to a certain number of plants. NORML has a pretty in-depth guide to the laws in each state. Colorado, Oregon, Nevada, Vermont, and Maine also allow cultivation, but again, the specifics depend on the state. Definitely clarify what your rights are before you start the glorious path to at-home bud gardening.

Johnson notes that the outdoor grow season lasts from around April to October, meaning if you plant seeds now, they’d still yield flower, but not much. Since it’s late in the season, he suggests buying a large clone, which will have more branches and therefore yield more flower.

Don’t go overboard, though, he warns. Start with growing three plants in five-gallon pots. This way, if one dies, you’ll still have two plants, and the pots will limit their growth. A general rule of thumb is that they’ll grow one foot for every gallon of soil. He recommends mixing your own organic soil, which he explains how to do on his website and will save you the headache of adding nutrients or pH testing. “The soil is what we call alive,” he says. “It’s always breaking things down to replenish nutrients that are missing.” But if you can’t mix your own soil, or don’t feel like it, you could buy organic Pro-Mix soil, which Johnson says many outdoor growers use.

When the pandemic hit, many of us turned to quaint pastimes to soothe our existential dread, whether it was baking sourdough, knitting, or doing jigsaw puzzles. If you want to expand your repertoire of distraction methods with an activity that still has that quiet, homey vibe, but with a bit more of an edge, consider growing your own weed.

There are different harvesting methods, but Johnson cuts the whole plant at the base and hangs it upside down with some twine in a dark room at a temperature of around 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Add a fan for airflow — you definitely don’t want the room to be humid, which will cause mold to grow, rendering your crop unusable. It’ll probably take around a week to dry.

Since clones come from plants that have been grown indoors, let yours chill in a shaded area for a week before exposing them to full sun, Johnson says. “The clone hasn’t tasted sun like that, and the transplant itself will be stressful.”

Whatever you do, don’t plant your clones in the ground. They’ll run rampant, and “you’ll have pounds of weed in your house,” Johnson says, recalling the trays of weed atop his kitchen table when his crop grew wild. “You don’t need the stress of plants getting out of control, growing over your fence.” If your neighbors can see them, they might complain about them, and having too many plants could get you arrested.

If you buy seeds from a seed bank, look for those labeled “feminized” to ensure they give rise to female plants, Johnson says. But if you’re a total newbie, he suggests buying clones, which are cuttings from a “mother” female plant, available at some dispensaries, as well as at nurseries. Not only are they easier to obtain, “they’re easier to grow. You get a clone, and you transplant it to some soil.”

Before you get started.

If you use organic soil, all you’ll really need to do is add water, Johnson says — but don’t overdo it. The number one mistake he sees new growers make is watering their plants too often. In general, “watering every day is too much. The rule is, if you pick up your plant, and the pot is heavy, then it has a enough water. If it’s light, it’s dry, then you need to water.” You could also stick your finger knuckle-deep into the soil; if it feels dry, add water.

Once you’ve cured your cannabis, sprinkle some bud in a bowl, or whatever your preferred method of imbibing might be, and savor your hard-earned crop.

Planting.

“You have to be careful when you’re ingesting it to make sure it doesn’t have mold on it. That can make you really sick,” Anderson said.

The Virginia Apartment Management Association is warning renters to proceed with caution. VAMA Executive Director Patrick McCloud said some leases have language banning substances considered illegal under state and federal law. He said that could cause problems since Congress has yet to address marijuana prohibition nationally. McCloud said tenants should check with management before getting started with home cultivation.

Netzel started using cannabis after her prescribed medication for Multiple Sclerosis made her liver go into failure. For months after that, she suffered from chronic pain and became depressed.

“The most immediate option for retail sales is to do so through the existing medical operators. This is what most states that have enacted adult use legalization do,” Pedini said. “Virginia still has a chance to go down that path but that wasn’t something that was enacted this year.”

But there’s a catch. There’s no legal way to buy the seeds.

“People have to read the fine print”

“Right now, you can have three plants and be in compliance and also have 300 pounds of marijuana in your house and, under Virginia law, you’re solid,” Katz said.

Anderson said four plants, if grown properly, can produce a years-worth of marijuana.

“You have to have control over heat and humidity, especially in Virginia,” Anderson said. “If you’re comfortable in an environment as a human, the plants are going to be comfortable as well.”

“You can start for as little as $150 bucks or you can get weird with it and spend as much as you want,” said Co-Founder Christopher Haynie.

Katz said, to be in compliance, they needs to be out of public view and out of reach of children. Plus, each plant needs to be labelled with the owners name, state identification number and a disclaimer that they are for personal use only.

“It can burn down houses and apartment buildings, between the lights and dehumidifiers needed to run all of this, it pulls a lot of power,” Anderson said. “That’s I think another reason the state of Virginia didn’t go huge. Four plants is plenty. It makes it so people can do it safely.”

House Democratic Leader Charniele Herring, who sponsored the bill, said she supported moving forward with that option in 2021 but she said the idea was shot down by others in her party.

Anderson said it typically takes about six months to get from seed to smoke. He said first-time growers should consider taking a class to avoid trial and error.

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC)- Starting July 1, Virginians will be able to legally grow up to four marijuana plants per household.

Chesterfield Police Chief Jeffrey Katz, who was speaking on behalf of the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police, said there are several regulations people need to follow to stay out of trouble.

“Everything you need…except the seeds”

Due to the federal prohibition on pot, Pedini said it’s illegal to have seeds mailed to you and to cross state lines after purchasing them elsewhere.

At the time, lawmakers were under pressure to move up the legalization of simple possession to this summer. To win over critics, supporters were looking for a way to allow the public to safely obtain marijuana before recreational sales go live, something that’s not expected to happen until 2024.

“I’m going to give it a try but I am afraid of messing up because the law is so complicated,” Netzel said.

In the 2022 session, Pedini wants lawmakers to create a legal avenue at the state level.

“People have to read the fine print. We’re going to do our best to educate people but we’re not going to not enforce the law,” Katz said.

“There was no appetite from some to allow dispensaries to do that because the rationale is they didn’t want them to have a leg up on the business of recreational marijuana,” Herring said. “Honestly, I lost on that one.”

“I’m the last person you would’ve thought would’ve tried cannabis but I was desperate.” Netzel said. “It was a choice I had to make and at that time I was like, I don’t want to break the law so I sought out people who wanted to change the law.”

How to get from seed to smoke.

As the Commonwealth enters new territory, many Virginians are wondering how to get started. Amid confusion, law enforcement and landlords are warning people to proceed with caution.

According to Jenn Michelle Pedini, the executive director of Virginia NORML, adults can gift seeds and other marijuana products to each other in certain circumstances, as long as no money changes hands.

While he can’t speak for all departments, Katz said, in Chesterfield, police are not going to be asking where people got their seeds.

Cody Anderson, a cannabis cultivation coach, said growing at home is a safer alternative for those concerned about toxins in black market products.

“I can tell you with absolute certainty that we are not going to create a task force to address homegrown marijuana plants. That’s not in the best interest of public safety or our community,” Katz said.

The gray area is a product of the accelerated timeline proposed by Gov. Ralph Northam’s office at the end of a lengthy legislative process.

The continued ban on the sale and purchase of seeds came as a surprise to the store. They initially advertised plans to start offering them on July 1 with lawn signs before realizing it wouldn’t be allowed.

Now, the law has changed and Netzel is among those hoping to grow at home as a cheaper alternative. Currently, she said she pays about $800 per month to use cannabis for her condition, not including the cost of periodically renewing her medical card recommendation.

Quebec Cannabis Seeds was founded in 2013, but still claims to have 15 years of experience in marijuana seed retail.

Cons.

Sometimes seeds are confiscated, but that’s why most companies offer a delivery guarantee, with a paid tracking charge . Larger packs may also be separated into multiple packages arriving, since a large pack of pot seeds would be difficult to hide in one small gift item.

The best weed seed sites should stand by their production processes. Anyone might be able to grow marijuana nowadays, thanks to autoflowers and feminized seeds, but not everyone can do it right.

Cons.

11. MaryJanesGarden – Easy Way to Order Cannabis Seeds Online.

Pros.

Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are the safest way to pay, since there would be no official record of you buying it, besides records maintained by the cryptocurrency wallet provider.

Remember you can also check online reviews of the best cannabis seed bank brands and which companies excelled at safety, shipping time, guaranteed products, and best of all, the quality of the seeds themselves.

Cannabis remains illegal at the federal level but legal in a number of U.S. states. No wonder all seed banks use stealth shipping to avoid legal hassles and confiscation.

Cons.

Pros.

The company does hassle you for a refund, but it’s understandable that they have to protect against unscrupulous “samplers” with no intent to pay for quality marijuana seeds.

Try Amsterdam Marijuana Seeds for the free gifts and keep coming back for its reputable seed bank brand, and from the city that started the whole craze. As a wise stoner in a pulpy black suit once said, “You’ll dig it the most.”

While Marijuana Seeds NL isn’t the oldest seed bank brand, it is arguably the first successful marijuana seed bank, and with a name that is still trusted today.

9. Quebec Cannabis Seeds – Most Popular Cannabis Seeds Packs.

Cons.

It’s never been easier to grow your own marijuana plant and all you need is a list of the best seed banks to get started.

Some online seed banks might not be legitimate, but the ones in this article are.

While many companies do seem to be a Canadian seed bank store, I Love Growing Marijuana and Rocket Seeds are both based in the United States and have a reputation for high-quality seeds.

Rocket Seeds is a great place to find hard-to-find seeds, since the company works with multiple sources all over the world, including other seed banks. In fact, they often crossover with competitors like Crop King Seeds, Mary Jane’s Garden, and Sunwest Genetics.

Mary Jane’s Garden may seem new but they’ve been selling seeds online since 2003, with a higher than average 90% successful delivery rate .

Do all marijuana seed banks have multiple payment methods?

Pros.

Overall, what we liked about Beaver Seeds was the customer service telephone line, which is operated 24-7 and is even linked to a US location. When you’re nervously waiting for cannabis seeds to be shipped in the mail, having customer support to speak to is really helpful.

Herbie’s Seeds offers good deals on selected strains, multiple forms of payment (including Bitcoin and wire transfer), and best of all, offers free Gorilla Glue Auto seeds with every purchase.

Cons.

Pros.

If you’re curious about the logistics of buying cannabis seeds online, we have answers!

Cons.